cara mengirim kambing

berikut adalah artikel yang membahas mengenai cara mengirim kambing dalam waktu lama,..saya dapatkan dari www.infoternak.com, juga ada artikle mengenai cara mencari buyer untuk export,..sangat menarik..

Australian Cashmere Goat

Kambing Cashmere Australia

Adalah kambing casmere yang berasal dari Australia.

Diimpor ke Australia pada tahun 1830-1832.

Kemudian mulai dikembang biakkan secara professional mulai tahun 1970an.

Ciri fisiknya tidak ada yg berubah dari angora-cashmere

Auckland Island Goat

Kambing Pulau Auckland

Kambing jenis ini sudah sangat langka, diperkirakan malah sudah punah.

Pada awal abad ke 19 dikembang biaka sebagai makanan pengelana da korban kapal karam yang berlindung di pulau Auckland. Pada tahun 1970 tinggal seekor saja menurut perkiraan. Sekitar 100 ekor diketemukan di sekitar Port Rose arah timur-utara mainland Auckland. Pada tahun 1986-1987 sekitar 60 ekor di pindahkan ke selandia baru untuk penangkaran. Pada tahun 1999 diperkirakan nasib keturunannya telah punah

Goat’s Milk: A Natural Alternative for Milk Sensitive Patients

The advertisement asks, “Got milk?” But what kind of milk? Twenty years ago, most people who routinely had milk with their morning cereal used whole milk. Today, with the concern for fat in the diet, many people have switched to low-fat milk or skim milk. And a significant number of people are opting for lactose reduced or lactose free milk.

There are other alternatives: take goat’s milk, for example. Patients with diarrhea, asthma, bloating and irritability may be suffering from the most common food allergy: cow’s milk. Goat milk is a natural alternative to cow milk and can comfortably be consumed by many patients who suffer from cow milk allergies or sensitivity.

Although goat milk, like cow’s milk and human milk, contains lactose, many people with lactose intolerance can drink goat milk. Why? It has been hypothesized that the reason lies in goat milk’s superior digestibility.

Goat milk is more completely and easily absorbed than cow’s milk, leaving less undigested residue behind in the colon to quite literally ferment and cause the uncomfortable symptoms of lactose intolerance.

It may also be that the patient is not lactose intolerant at all, but instead is one of the 1-in-10 people who are allergic to the major protein of cow’s milk … alpha S1 casein protein. The symptoms are almost identical to those of lactose intolerance. Both goat milk and human milk lack this offending protein.

The digestibility of goat milk can be attributed to its casein curd, which is both softer and smaller than that produced by cow*s milk. The smaller and softer the curd, the more easily accepted by the human digestive system.

Another significant difference between cow’s milk and goat milk is found in the composition and structure of fat. The average size of goat milk fat globules is about two micrometers, as compared to 2 1/2 to 3 1/2 micrometers for cow’s milk. These smaller sized fat globules provide a better dispersion and a more homogenous mixture of fat in the milk, another factor in making goat milk easier to digest.

Goat milk contains more of the essential fatty acids (linoleic and arachidonic acids) and a higher proportion of short-chain and medium-chain fatty acids than cow’s milk. The fat in goat milk may be more readily digested and absorbed than cow milk because lipases attack ester linkages of such fatty acids more readily than those of longer chains. And, unlike cow’s milk, goat milk does not contain agglutinin; as a result, the fat globules in goat milk do not cluster, which helps facilitate digestion and absorption.

Goat milk is a nutritious dairy option for many patients of different age groups and lifestyle needs. Young children and seniors can be especially sensitive to cow’s milk and so can certain ethnic groups, including Asians, Hispanics, African Americans and Native Americans.

Goat milk is an excellent option for any patient who is cow milk or soy milk sensitive and is necessarily concerned with obtaining adequate calcium from a natural dietary source. Goat milk is also an excellent source of dietary calcium important in the prevention of high blood pressure, osteoporosis and other bone-related problems. For menopausal women, goat milk provides 13% more calcium than cow’s milk and can be consumed comfortably even by those women with milk sensitivity.

While it is often recommended that children who have problems digesting cow’s milk change to vegetable protein soy-based formula, that is not always the answer. An estimated 20%-50% of children with cow milk protein intolerance will react adversely to soy proteins. Goat milk is a natural milk that children like and can consume comfortably, even if they are sensitive to cow’s milk and/or soy formula.

The nutrient composition of goat milk is very different than that of cow’s milk. In addition to containing 13% more calcium than cow’s milk, goat milk also has 25% more vitamin B-6, 47% more vitamin A, 134% more potassium and 350% more niacin. Goat milk is also higher in chloride, copper and manganese and contains 27% more of the essential nutrient selenium. Goat milk contains none of the controversial Bovine Growth Hormone (BGH).

References:

  1. Luke B, Keith LG. “Calcium requirements and the diets of women and children.” Journal of Reproductive Medicine.
  2. Haenlein GFW. “Role of goat milk in human nutrition.” International Conference on Goats, University of Delaware.
  3. Haenlein GFW, Ace D. Extension Goat Handbook. United States Department of Agriculture/USDA.

This article was taken from: http://www.chiroweb.com/archives/15/25/09.html

Scientific Reasons Goats Milk has superior Digestibility

For many years goats milk has been an excellent source of nutrition for many Americans who could not consume cows milk. In fact more people in the world drink goats milk than cows milk. There are many testimonials concerning the health benefits of drinking goats milk and consuming goat’s milk products. Initially, these testimonials were mainly concerning babies who were allergic to cows milk or infant formulas, or from adults with digestive problems.

In recent years there have been many additional testimonials of how goats milk is an excellent supplementary source of nutrition to end stage cancer patients and HIV patients. The testimonials state that it greatly increases quality of life for these individuals by having a soothing effect on the gut and helping to maintain body weight, when most other food are no longer digestible.

There are published reasons why goats milk is a more digestible food when compared to cows milk. One major reason may be because goats milk contains higher levels of Medium chain triglycerides, (6-12 carbon length) than cows milk. (1) Medium chain triglycerides (MCT) have been used in specialized diets for humans with malabsorption problems and in parenteral or intravenous nutrition. (2), (3) MCT absorption and conversion to energy requires fewer steps and enzymes than do long chain triglycerides. (2) Absorption of MCT’s can take place even when the body is devoid of certain enzymes necessary for long chain triglyceride transport into the blood stream. (4)

This may help explain the large number of testimonials of the increased digestive quality of goats milk shared by people with digestive disorders. Surely there may be many other differences that are not explained yet using scientific research. We feel that so many testimonials, from so many different people, for so many years cannot be wrong.

We challenge you to put goats milk to the test and see if it can help you or someone you know. Drake Family Farms, one of Utah’s historic Centennial Farms is pleased to announce they now have delicious fresh goat milk available for sale to the public at their Grade A Goat Dairy conveniently located in West Jordan.  We have a self service farm store located at our farm.  Our Farm Store is open from 8:00 AM-10:00 PM Monday-Saturday.  We are closed on Sunday.   The farm address is 1856 Drake Lane.  Drake Lane is 7400 S. on the Salt Lake county Road system.   To get to our farm you will need to turn onto Drake lane (7400 S.) from Redwood Road.  This will be a right hand turn if you are heading South on Redwood Road and a left hand turn if you are heading North on Redwood Road.  Look for the Goat Dairy sign and the Centennial Farm marker at the bottom of the Lane.  There is also a green street sign that says “Drake Lane”.   Once you are on Drake Lane, you will be heading west.  After you go up the lane a fair bit, there will be a light red brick house on your right with another Centennial farm marker in the front yard.  Drive past that house and look to your right and you will see our little farm store.  There is also a park bench there in front of a pen of goats.  Bring the kids and sit awhile watching the goats.  The goats in that pen our “retired goats”  that are taking it easy.  In the spring and summer we will try and put a couple retired mother goats in there with some baby goats.  It is relaxing to stop and watch the baby goats play.

Since our farm store is self service please bring correct change for your products.  Our pasteurized milk is $4 for a half gallon bottle and our Raw milk is $5 for a half gallon bottle.  If for some reason we are out of milk please call us at (801)255-MILK (6455), or come to our house.  Our house is North of the farm store and is a white brick house.  We always try to keep a good selection in the farm store but we often have someone from out of town come through and buy up large quantities of milk so sometimes we are out and need to bottle more milk.  Sorry we can’t always anticipate what the demand will be for a given day and we don’t want to overstock the store and compromise the freshness of our delicious milk.

Our farm is a family farm where all the goats have names and receive only the highest standard of humane and loving care. Over the years our goal has been to produce superior quality delicious tasting goat milk. Our milk has no additives, preservatives, artificial colors, or artificial flavorings.

Our milk is produced using only the finest feed ingredients and no artificial hormones or rBST (Bovine Growth Hormone). If you would like more information on our goat milk or cheese please call us at (801)255-1615.

References:

  1. USDA Nutrient Database for Standard Reference, Release 13 (November 1999). http://www.nal.usda.gov/fnic/cgi-bin/list_nut.pl
  2. Klein, S.; Cohn, S.M.; Alpers, D.H. The alimentary tract in nutrition: a tutorial. Shils, M.E.; Olson, J.A.; Shike, M.; Ross, A.C. eds. Modern nutrition in health and disease. Baltimore: Williams and Wilkins; 1999: p. 623.
  3. Traul, K.A.; Driedger, A.; Ingle, D.L.; Nakhasi, D.; Review of the toxicologic properties of medium-chain triglycerides. Food and Chemical Toxicology, 2000 Jan, 38(1):79-98.
  4. Jenkins, D.; Wolever, T.; Jenkins, A. Fiber and other dietary factors affecting nutrient absorption and metabolism. Shils, M.E.; Olson, J.A.; Shike, M.; Ross, A.C. eds. Modern nutrition in health and disease. Baltimore: Williams and Wilkins; 1999: p. 683.

get from ::  http://www.drakefamilyfarms.com/scientific.htm

The Nutritional Benefits of Goat Milk

*By Miriah Reynolds*

Charts that compare goat milk to cow milk or other types of milk are readily available on the Internet, in books, or wherever one might search when looking for that information. Maybe they all originate from the same place, or maybe it is just a proven fact that goat milk is really better than cow milk in comparison, but unless one hears a true-life story of the benefits of goat milk, there are still some doubts that linger. I do not know why it is so hard for the general public to believe in the goodness of goat milk but I do know that I and my family have experienced, first hand, the benefits of drinking goat milk on a regular basis.

Goat milk is one of healthiest foods/drinks out on the market today. With its creamy texture, high mineral and vitamin content, goat milk replaces many of the supplements which people consume daily. Goat milk is better for most people than cow milk simply because it is composed of smaller fat globules which makes it easier to digest. This speed of digestion releases more good bacteria and enzymes in the consumer’s body, better enabling them to absorb and utilize the nutrients without discomfort, stomach ache, or a variety of other typical milk allergy symptoms.

There are those who avoid goat milk because they do not appreciate the differences between cow and goat milk, and in some cases I agree. Goat milk is definitely a little thicker, richer, and creamier than the average homogenized cow milk available at the grocery store. For someone who is used to drinking 2% or skim cow milk, there is going to be a big change in taste when compared with whole goat milk. Being a goat farmer, I definitely prefer a glass of goat milk over cow milk any day. No disrespect, but after drinking the rich, sweet goat milk on our farm, I find that drinking cow milk purchased from a store is like having a glass of sour water. Now, a true comparison of rich flavorful, perhaps Jersey cow whole milk and rich, sweet goat milk, might reveal little taste difference at all. But most people forget the differences or origin and content when comparing cow and goat milk flavor.

Scientific studies and taste tests are fun, but learning about the true benefits of drinking goat milk can only come from those who have experienced such and in my family, it is my mother who can best relate.

My mother, Melody Reynolds, was diagnosed with Crohn’s Disease when she was 18 years old. Doctors immediately pulled dairy out of her diet as well as fiber, and put her on heavy medication. She lost massive amounts of bone density and was told she could never gain it back. Faithfully obeying doctors orders for several years, the frustration of making no progress encouraged my mom to seek non-medical advice. Her search for a way to save her life led her to goat milk. Ignoring the doctors’ requests, my mom drank raw goat milk. She said that her body felt as though it was craving milk and that she knew it was the right thing to do.

Months and years later, through a series of bone scans, doctors were astonished to find that she gained back 80% of her bone density and regained functional, even good, physical health. The damage that was done to her large and small intestines went from a necrotic to a healthy state of function. She said that she is convinced that goat milk and prayer were the main factors that helped her heal. Doctors also told my mom that she would never be able to have children, and well, as her daughter, I can well attest to the error of that prediction too. Maybe I am here due to the wonderful benefits of drinking goat milk.

My mom said that because of her will power not to give in to the disease, as well as the gallons of goat milk she drank, she made an unprecidented recovery from a destructive disease. She is still required to go to the doctor for regular testing and monitoring, and these professionals shake their heads in amazement when she tells them her recovery was based on drinking goat milk.

There are many production factors and human errors in management that can affect the flavor of goat milk. We owe it to our goats and to our fellow human beings to make it a priority to produce the best tasting, cleanest, quickest cooled goat milk possible and make this available to the public on a regular basis so more people, like my mother, can enjoy a healthy life because of it. Everyone deserves a chance to experience great tasting goat milk!

article from ::  http://www.dairygoatjournal.com/issues/87/87-4/nutritional_benefits_of_goat_milk.html

Goat Milk Versus Cow Milk

Although Americans are accustomed to cow’s milk, goat’s milk is much more common in most other parts of the world. Goats are hardier than cows, are inexpensive, and take up less space.

Goat’s milk is closest to mother’s milk than any other food. Goat’s milk is a complete protein and contains every essential amino acid. Yet it contains significantly less fat than cow’s milk.

Goat milk is easy to digest, even for babies. Goat milk has more medium chain fatty acids than cow milk, which aids in easier digestion. Goat milk fat consists of 35 percent medium chain fatty acids, compared with 17 percent found in cow milk. Almost half of people who are lactose intolerant are able to drink goat’s milk.

Three different medium chain fatty acids found in goat milk are thought to have health benefits for people with certain types of diseases, especially diseases involving metabolism. Some of these conditions include cystic fibrosis, gallstones, heart disease, and various digestive problems. Goat milk has three times more of these types of medium chain fatty acids than cow milk.

Goat’s milk contains less of the enzyme xanthine oxidase than cow’s milk. When this enzyme enters the bloodstream, it can create scar tissue on the heart. This, in turn, causes the body to produce cholesterol for protection. This can be a precursor to arteriosclerosis.

Goat milk contains more vitamin A than cow milk. Cow milk’s vitamin A content is partially consistent of carotenoids, which must be turned into vitamin A by the body. All of the vitamin A found in goat milk is pre-formed. This is an advantage to people with health conditions which prevent their bodies from being able to form vitamin A from carotenoids. Goat’s milk also contains more riboflavin than cow’s milk.

A cup of goat’s milk has almost 33 percent of the recommended daily allowance for calcium, compared to almost 30 percent of the recommended daily allowance for calcium in a cup of cow’s milk.

A cup of goat milk also supplies more protein than a cup of cow milk, almost nine grams of protein compared to about eight grams of protein in cow milk.

Raw Goat Milk Benefits

You may ask ‘raw goat milk’? Why should I care about it. American’s have been ‘culturized & advertised’ into associating milk with cows when in fact, goat milk is far more healthy for humans. In Maud, Texas goat milk is all we drink – it’s God’s complete food!

According to the Journal of American Medicine, “Goat’s milk is the most complete food known.” It contains vitamins, minerals, electrolytes, trace elements, enzymes, protein, and fatty acids that are utilized by your body with ease. In fact, your body can digest goat’s milk in just 20 minutes. It takes 2-3 hours to digest cow’s milk.

Excerpt from “The Maker’s Diet” by Jordan S. Rubin…

‘You shall have enough goats’ milk for your food, for the food of your household, and the nourishment of your maidservants’ (Proverbs 27:27).

The milk consumed in biblical times differed much from the milk we consume today. The milk of the Bible came from cows and goats and was consumed straight from the animal (it was not pasturized or homogenized), or it was immediately fermented. These ‘live’ foods provide excellent health benefits in contrast to today’s pasturized, homogenized, often skimmed and ‘refortified’ milk, which is not only less nutritious but also can be potentially harmful and a major cause of allergies and even heart disease. (pg 147)

Goat’s Milk Soothes the Digestive Tract Below are some of the health benefits attributed to raw goat milk consumption:

  • Goat’s milk is less allergic – It does not contain the complex protein that stimulate allergic reactions to cow’s milk.)
  • Goat’s milk does not suppress the immune system.
  • Goat’s milk is easier to digest than cow’s milk (An old statistic showed that goat’s milk will digest in a baby’s stomach in twenty minutes, whereas pasturized cow’s milk takes eight hours.  The difference is in the structure of the milk.)
  • Goat’s milk has more buffering capacity than over the counter antacids. (The USDA and Prairie View A&M University in Texas have confirmed that goat’s milk has more acid-buffering capacity than cow’s milk, soy infant formula, and nonprescription antacid drugs.)
  • Goat’s milk alkalinizes the digestive system.  It actually contains an alkaline ash, and it does not produce acid in the intestinal system.  Goat’s milk helps to increase the pH of the blood stream because it is the dairy product highest in the amino acid L-glutamine.  L-glutamine is an alkalinizing amino acid, often recommended by nutritionists.

Pg. 148 – “The Makers Diet”

  • Goat’s milk contains twice the healthful medium-chain fatty acids, such as capric and caprylic acids, which are highly antimicrobial. (They actually killed the bacteria used to test for the presence of antibiotics in cow’s milk!)
  • Goat’s milk does not product mucus; it does not stimulate a defense response from the human immune system.
  • Goat’s milk is a rich source of the trace mineral selenium, a necessary nutrient, however, for its immune modulation and antioxidant properties.

Pg 149 “The Maker’s Diet”

Lactose Intolerant?

  • Easier digestion allows the lactose to pass through the intestines more rapidly, not giving it time to ferment or cause an osmotic imbalance.
  • Goat’s milk also contains 7% less lactose than cow milk.
  • Additionally, most lactose intolerant people have found that they can tolerate goat’s milk and goat milk products.
  • Goat’s milk has long been used and recommended as an aid in the treatment of ulcers due to its more effective acid buffering capacity.
  • Children on goat’s milk have been observed to sleep through the night and remain more satisfied between meals.
  • Mother Nature is very Clever
  • Natural milk contains many bioactive components, which serve to retard the growth of harmful organisms, and to protect the health of the person consuming them. Goat’s milk contains the same important bioactive components as mother’s milk.

Medicinal properties of goat milk

The importance of feeding of infants with goat milk has been recognized since ancient days. In developed countries like U.S and South Africa, the goat milk is specifically marketed for the infants. The milk allergy problem common in infants fed with cow milk is rarely encountered when replaced with goat milk and it plays an important role in the formulation of infant formula. This is a proof of the medicinal property of goat milk.

The symptoms like gastrointestinal disturbances, vomiting, colic, diarrhoea, constipation and respiratory problems can be eliminated when goat milk is fed to the infants. The reason cited for the relief in respiratory problems when fed with goat milk can be attributed to the structure of casein micelle of the goat milk. Pasteurized goat milk is well tolerated by the infants with gastro intestinal or respiratory symptoms. Fermented goat milk products are ideal for the persons allergic to cow milk.

The goat milk is naturally homogenized. It forms a soft curd when compared to cow milk and hence helps in easy digestion and absorption. Regular intake of goat milk significantly improves the body weight gain, improved mineralization of skeleton, increased blood serum vitamin, mineral and haemoglobin levels. These points are considered advantageous when compared to consumption of human milk.

The other medicinal property of goat milk is higher concentration of medium chain fatty acids which play an important role in imparting unique health benefits in mal-absorption syndrome, steatorrhoea, chyluria, hyperlipoproteinaemia and during conditions of cystic fibrosis, gall stones and childhood epilepsy. The medium chain fatty acids minimize cholesterol deposition in the arteries, aid in dissolving cholesterol and gallstones and significantly contribute to normal growth of infants.

quoted from:  www.DairyforAll.com

“How Breast Milk Protects Newborns” chart compiled by White Egret Farm

Modified from Newman, J., Scientific American, December 1995

Raw Goat’s Milk, Breast Milk vs Retail Cow’s Milk, Infant Formula
Component Action Brst Milk Goat Milk Cow Milk Inft Frm
â_lymphocytes Produce antibodies, which target harmful microbes X X
Macrophages Immune cells, which kill microbes in baby’s gut; produce lysozyme, an enzyme, which digest the cell walls of harmful bacteria and activate other componenets of the immune system X X
Neutrophils White blood cells, which may ingest bacteria in baby’s digestive system X X
T_lymphocytes Kill infected cells directly or send out ‘alarms’, which stimulate other parts of the immune system X X
IgA/IgG Secretory Antibodies Prevent microbes in the intestine from invading other tissues X X
B-12 binding protein Reduces vitamin B12 in the colon; a vitamin, which harmful bacteria need for growth X X
Bifidus factor Promotes growth of Lactobacillus bifidus, a helpful bacterium in baby’s gut, which helps crowd out dangerous germs X X
Fatty acids Disrupt membranes of viruses and destroys them X X X X
Fibronectin Increases antimicrobial activity of macrophages and helps to repair damaged tissures X X
Gamma-Interferon Enhances antimicrobial activity of immune cells X X
Lactoferrin Binds to iron, making it unavailable for germs X X
Lysozyme Kills germs by disrupting their cell walls X X
Mucins & Oligosaccharides Bind to bacteria and viruses, prventing them from attaching to baby’s, gut; encourage growth of friendly bacteria X X X
Hormones and Growth factors Stimulate baby’s digestive tract to mature and seal itself, reducing risk of infection X X X

article from::: http://www.roseofsharonacres.com/raw_goat_milk_benefits

THE AMAZING BENEFITS of GOAT MILK PRODUCTS

Goat milk is as close to a perfect food as possible in nature. Its chemical structure is amazingly similar to mother’s milk. It is a complete protein containing all the essential amino acids without the heavy fat content and catarrh producing materials of cow’s milk.

If you have been around farms, you would notice goats are much more flexible and limber than cows. They can climb and do things that are beautiful to watch. I have seen goats get on the roofs of barns and houses and wondered how it was possible. the reason for this is that goats are a bioorganic sodium animal, while cows are a calcium animal.

Bioorganic sodium in known in Naturopathic Medicine as the youth element. Arthritis does not come with old age. It is a lack of this essential mineral that brings on the symptoms of old age.The highest sources of bioorganic sodium is found in goat milk and sweet goat whey. Abunda Life Goat Milk products contain both quick dried goat milk and the whey. It is the sodium that keeps the goats young, active, flexible, and limber all of their lives. There are no old goats in the human sense. They can climb, jump, leap, and walk all of their lives because bioorganic sodium is the joining mobilizing material that makes this possible.

Each organ of the body has a reserve of one chemical element more than others. It holds certain chemical elements so that it is a unique active organ. This principle, known as “The Chemical Story,” is one of the essential principles of Naturopathic Medicine.

Dr. Koenig of Germany, in autopsy after autopsy, discovered that there is more sodium stored in the stomach than any other organ of the body. The stomach is known as a bioorganic sodium organ in naturopathic medicine. When the body becomes deficient in bioorganic sodium foods do not digest properly. The stomach’s ability to produce enzymes and hydrochloric acid is slowed down and we experience belching, bloating, and ulcers become possible along with many other digestive problems. Coffee, tea, sugar, white flour products, chocolate, alcohol, and especially soda drinking produces a high stomach acid imbalance that sucks the bioorganic sodium right off the walls of the stomach and colon. This condition sometimes takes many years to manifest itself and is not noticed until it becomes a named disease. It is for this reason that we do not permit soda in the house at Abunda Life.

The endless array of mindless over-the-counter drugs like Tums, Pepto Bismal, and bicarbonite of soda, as you may well know, is the wrong type of sodium. Like all drugs, without exception, cause more long term problems than short term solutions. In naturopathic medicine we believe that God provided the answer in Food Medicine. Goat milk and goat whey are natural food medicines designed to both nourish and heal, prevent and treat the stomach, colon, intestines, and arthritic like conditions.

I’ve seen goat milk perform wonders at Abunda Life Clinic with both children and adults. I have seen people who could not digest a single food come back to health with goat milk. Many mothers have thrown out the plastic mixes called baby formulas to have their children grow strong and healthy without drugging them and without heavy mucus that cows milk often produces. Some people have resurrected from the dead with goat milk.

Dr. Jensen told me that Ghandi was always able to rapidly come back to excellent health after his very prolonged fasts because of goat milk. Goat milk is one of the best food medicines for rebuilding the brain, nervous sytem, and mental faculties. Goat milk is one of the finest foods for regenerating the cells of the body and bringing a person back to health.

After mother’s milk, goat milk is the ideal food for weaning a child. It is the nearest to mother’s milk in composition, nutrients, and natural chemical properties. It is easy to digest and is a magnificent bodybuilding food. Its fat globules are one ninth the size as cow’s milk, making it easier to digest. If you don’t homogenize cow’s milk you must remove some of the cream. With goats milk this is not neccessary as it is naturally homogenized.

One common denominator that Dr. Jensen discovered in his 70 year study of people over the age of 100, in visiting 90 countries, was goat milk. Margaret Patton of London died at 137 years old. Jonathan Hartop walks 9 miles a day at the age of 136 and lived to be 138. Thomas Parr lived 152 years and Peter Czartin from Austria live to be 184. All lived on goat milk. This is not surprising to some who realize that the only milk referred to in the Bible, as food, is goat milk (Proverbs 27:27).

  • Abunda Life Goat Milk is not only highly nutritious, but is so delicious that children love it. One 12 ounce container makes 2 gallons or 8 quarts or 32 eight ounce glasses of reconstituted goat milk.
  • Abunda Life’s Goat Milk is so highly nutritous that it can often serve as a meal substitute or healthy snack in itself. It is so delicious that children and adults love it. Goat milk is the number one substitute for cow milk made by most Naturopathic Doctors for the following reasons:
    1. Goat milk is a highly comabtible nourishing natural food for people who are allergic to cow milk.
    2. Cow milk is mucus forming to many people. Goat milk is not only non-mucus forming, but actually helps to neutralize mucus.
    3. The fat content in goat milk is very low compared to cow milk. The fat globules are 1/9 the size of cow milk making it a very easy natural food to break down.
    4. Certain ethnic groups, especially Jews and Blacks and some Hispanics are lactate intolerant, which means that their bodies can react adversly to cow milk and cow milk products. For these people goat milk can be the perfect substitute
    5. The chemical structure of goat milk is very close to that of mother’s milk.
    6. The elements of goat milk are similar to those found in the stomach, colon, intestines, and joints. Thereby making goat milk the perfect food for these symptoms.
    7. Goat milk digests easily making it the perfect food for children, the elderly, those with digestive difficulties, those recuperating from a disease or health conditions, and your pets that have been weaned from their mother.
    8. Goat milk neutralizes acids and toxins.
    9. Goat milk is high in healing enzymes and has a superior form of calcium than cow milk.
    10. Goat milk is compatible with most Abunda Life powder formulas.
QUESTION 1: What are the health benefits of
goat milk over cow milk?
QUESTION 2: Can we use goat milk if we are sensitive to cow milk?

A. One of the more significant differences from cow milk is found in the composition and structure of fat in goat milk. The average size of goat milk fat globules is about 2 micrometers, as compared to 2 1/2 – 3 1/2 micrometers for cow milk fat. These smaller sized fat globules provide a better dispersion, and a more homogeneous mixture of fat in the milk. Research indicates that there is more involved to the creaming ability of milk than merely physical size of the fat globules.

It appears that their clustering is favored by the presence of an agglutinin in milk which is lacking in goat milk, therefore creating a poor creaming ability, especially at lower temperatures. The natural homogenization of goat milk is, from a human health standpoint, much better than the mechanically homogenized cow milk product. It appears that when fat globules are forcibly broken up by mechanical means, it allows an enzyme associated with milk fat, known as xanthine oxidase to become free and penetrate the intestinal wall.

Once xanthine oxidase gets through the intestinal wall and into the bloodstream, it is capable of creating scar damage to the heart and arteries, which in turn may stimulate the body to release cholesterol into the blood in an attempt to lay a protective fatty material on the scarred areas. This can lead to arteriosclerosis.

It should be noted that this effect is not a problem with natural (unhomogenized) cow milk. In unhomogenized milk this enzyme is normally excreted from the body without much absorption. (I.E. milk that comes as God naturally made it is best for you and not the man handled and distorted version of milk.. .this is my opinion).

Another significant difference from cow milk is the higher amount of shorter-chain fatty acids in the milk fat of goats. Furthermore, glycerol ethers are much higher in goat then in cow milk which appears to be important for the nutrition of the nursing newborn.

Goat milk also has lower contents of orotic acid which can be significant in the prevention of fatty liver syndrome. However, the membranes around fat globules in goat milk are more fragile which may be related to their greater susceptibility to develop off flavors than cow milk

goat cow human
fat % 3.8 3.6 4.0
solids-not-fat % 8.9 9.0 8.9
lactose % 4.1 4.7 6.9
nitrogen x 6.38% 3.4 3.2 1.2
protein % 3.0 3.0 1.1
casein % 2.4 2.6 0.4
calcium % CaO 0.19 0.18 0.04
phosphorus P2O5 % .27 .23 .06
chloride % .15 .10 .06
iron (P/100,000) .07 .08 .2
vitamin A (i.u./g fat) 39.0 21.0 32.0
vitamin B (ug/100 m) 68.0 45.0 17.0
riboflavin (ug/100ml) 210.0 159.0 26.0
vitamin C (mg asc. a/100ml) 2.0 2.0 3.0
vitamin D (i.u./g fat) .07 0.7 0.3
Calories /100ml 70.0 69.0 68.0

Goat’s milk is a very good source of calcium and the amino acid tryptophan. It is also a good source of protein, phosphorous, riboflavin (vitamin B2) and potassium. Perhaps the greatest benefit of goat’s milk, however, is that some people who cannot tolerate cow’s milk are able to drink goat’s milk without any problems.

It is not clear from scientific research studies exactly why some people can better tolerate goat’s milk. Some initial studies suggested that specific proteins known to cause allergic reactions may have been present in cow’s milk in significant quantities yet largely absent in goat’s milk. The alpha-casein proteins, including alpha s1-casein, and the beta-casein proteins were both considered in this regard. However, more recent studies suggest that the genetic wiring for these casein proteins is highly variable in both cows and goats and that more study is needed to determine the exact role these proteins might play in the tolerability of goat’s milk versus cow’s milk. Other research has found some anti-inflammatory compounds (short-chain sugar molecules called oligosaccharides) to be present in goat’s milk.

These oligosaccharides may make goat’s milk easier to digest, especially in the case of compromised intestinal function. In animal studies, goat’s milk has also been shown to enhance the metabolism of both iron and copper, especially when there are problems with absorption of minerals in the digestive tract. These factors and others are likely to play an important role in the tolerability of goat’s milk versus cow’s milk. Allergy to cow’s milk has been found in many people with conditions such as recurrent ear infections, asthma, eczema, and even rheumatoid arthr

itis. Replacing cow’s milk with goat’s milk may help to reduce some of the symptoms of these conditions.

Goat’s milk can sometimes even be used as a replacement for cow’s milk-based infant formulas for infants who have difficulties with dairy products. Unfortunately, goat’s milk is lacking in several nutrients that are necessary for growing infants, so parents interested in trying goat’s milk instead of cow’s milk-based formula for their infants should ask their pediatricians or other qualified healthcare practitioners for recipes and ways to add these important and vital nutrients. For older children and adults, however, goat’s milk can be an excellent calcium-rich alternative to cow’s milk as, in addition to calcium, it contains many of the same nutrients found in cow’s milk.

CALCIUM
A Mineral for a lot More than Strong Bones

Goat’s milk is a very good source of calcium. Calcium is widely recognized for its role in maintaining the strength and density of bones. In a process known as bone mineralization, calcium and phosphorous join to form calcium phosphate. Calcium phosphate is a major component of the mineral complex (called hydroxyapatite) that gives structure and strength to bones. A cup of goat’s milk supplies 32.6% of the daily value for calcium along with 27.0% of the DV for phosphorus. In comparison, a cup of cow’s milk provides 29.7% of the DV for calcium and 23.2% of the DV for phosphorus.

Building bone is, however, far from all that calcium does for us. In recent studies, this important mineral has been shown to:

  • Help protect colon cells from cancer-causing chemicals
  • Help prevent the bone loss that can occur as a result of menopause or certain conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis
  • Help prevent migraine headaches in those who suffer from them
  • Reduce PMS symptoms during the luteal phase (the second half) of the menstrual cycle

Calcium also plays a role in many other vital physiological activities, including blood clotting, nerve conduction, muscle contraction, regulation of enzyme activity, cell membrane function and blood pressure regulation. Because these activities are essential to life, the body utilizes complex regulatory systems to tightly control the amount of calcium in the blood, so that sufficient calcium is always available.

As a result, when dietary intake of calcium is too low to maintain adequate blood levels of calcium, calcium stores are drawn out of the bones to maintain normal blood concentrations.

Dairy Foods Better than Calcium
Supplements for Growing Girls’ Bones

For young girls going through the rapid growth spurts of puberty, getting calcium from dairy products, such as goat’s milk, may be better for building bone than taking a calcium supplement, suggests a study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

Finnish researchers enrolled 195 healthy girls aged 10-12 years and divided them into 4 groups. One group was given supplemental calcium (1000 mg) + vitamin D3 (200 IU) each day. The second group received only supplemental calcium (1000 mg/day). The third group ate cheese supplying 1,000 mg of calcium each day, and the fourth group was given a placebo supplement.

At the beginning and end of the study, DEXA (dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry) scans were run to check bone indexes of the hip, spine, and whole body, and the radius and tibia were checked by peripheral quantitative computed tomography.

At the conclusion of the study, girls getting their calcium from cheese had higher whole-body bone mineral density and cortical thickness of the tibia than girls given supplemental calcium + vitamin D, supplemental calcium alone, or placebo. While the researchers noted that differences in the rate at which different children naturally grow might account for some of the differences seen in bone mineral density, they concluded: “Increasing calcium intake by consuming cheese appears to be more beneficial for cortical bone mass accrual than the consumption of tablets containing a similar amount of calcium.”

CALCIUM RICH DAIRY FOODS
Boost the Body’s Burning of Fat After a Meal

Those ads linking a daily cup of yogurt to a slimmer silhouette may have a real basis in scientific fact. A study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition not only shows a calcium-rich diet is associated with fat loss but may help explain why.

Normal-weight women ranging in age from 18-30 years were randomly assigned to a low (less than 800 mg per day) or high (1000-1400 mg per day) calcium diet for 1 year, and the rate at which their bodies burned fat after a meal was assessed at the beginning and end of the study.

After 1 year, fat oxidation (burning) was 20 times higher in women eating the high calcium diet compared to those in the low-calcium control group (0.10 vs. 0.06 gram per minute).

The women’s blood levels of parathyroid hormone were also checked and were found to correlate with their rate of fat oxidation. (The primary function of parathyroid hormone is to maintain normal levels of calcium in the body. When calcium levels drop too low, parathyroid hormone is secreted to instruct bone cells to release calcium into the bloodstream.)

Higher blood levels of parathyroid hormone were associated with a lower rate of fat oxidation and lower dietary calcium intake, while lower blood levels of parathyroid hormone levels were seen in the women consuming a diet high in calcium, who were burning fat more rapidly after a meal. So, it appears that a high-calcium diet increases fat oxidation, at least in part, by lessening the need for parathyroid hormone secretion, thus keeping blood levels of the hormone low.

Dairy Foods Protective AGAINST Metabolic Syndrome

Including goat’s milk and other dairy products in your healthy way of eating may reduce your risk of metabolic syndrome by up to 62%, shows the 20-year Caerphilly prospective study involving 2,375 Welsh men ranging in age from 45-59. Researchers have proposed that conjugated linolenic acid (a healthy fat found in greatest amounts in dairy foods from grass fed cows and goats) may improve insulin action and reduce blood glucose levels.
J Epidemiol Community Health. 2007 Aug;61(8):695-8.

Practical Tip: Enjoy a pint of milk and/or a serving of yogurt, cottage cheese or cheese daily. Men who drank a daily pint of milk in the Caerphilly study reduced their risk of metabolic syndrome by 62%. Regular consumption of other dairy products, such as yogurt and cheese, reduced metabolic syndrome risk by 56%.

Dairy Foods’ Calcium Protective against Breast Cancer

When French researchers analyzed the dietary intakes of 3,627 women using five 24-hour records completed over the course of 18 months, those with the highest average dairy intake had a 45% lower risk of developing breast cancer than women with the lowest average intake. When only pre-menopausal women were considered, benefits were even greater; those with the highest average dairy intake had a 65% reduction in breast cancer risk.

Analysis indicates the calcium provided by dairy foods is the reason why. Increasing calcium intake was associated with a 50% reduction in breast cancer risk for the whole population, and a 74% reduction for pre-menopausal women. Ann Nutr Metab. 2007;51(2):139-45. Epub 2007 May 29.

Energy Producing Riboflavin

Goat’s milk is a very good source of riboflavin, a B vitamin important for energy production. Riboflavin (vitamin B2) plays at least two important roles in the body’s energy production. When active in energy production pathways, riboflavin takes the form of flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) or flavin mononucleotide (FMN). In these forms, riboflavin attaches to protein enzymes called flavoproteins that allow oxygen-based energy production to occur. Flavoproteins are found throughout the body, particularly in locations where oxygen-based energy production is constantly needed, such as the heart and other muscles.

Riboflavin’s other role in energy production is protective. The oxygen-containing molecules the body uses to produce energy can be highly reactive and can inadvertently cause damage to the mitochondria (the energy production factories in every cell) and even the cells themselves. In the mitochondria, such damage is largely prevented by a small, protein-like molecule called glutathione. Like many “antioxidant” molecules, glutathione must be constantly recycled, and it is vitamin B2 that allows this recycling to take place. (Technically, vitamin B2 is a cofactor for the enzyme glutathione reductase that reduces the oxidized form of glutathione back to its reduced version.) Riboflavin been shown to be able to reduce the frequency of migraine headaches in people who suffer from them.

One cup of goat’s milk supplies 20.0% of the daily value for riboflavin, comparable to the 23.5% of the DV for riboflavin provided in a cup of cow’s milk.

A Good Source of Protein

Goat’s milk is a good source of low-cost high-quality protein, providing 8.7 grams of protein (17.4% of the daily value for protein) in one cup versus cow’s milk, which provides 8.1 grams or 16.3% of the DV for protein. The structure of humans and animals is built on protein. We rely on animal and vegetable protein for our supply of amino acids, and then our bodies rearrange the nitrogen to create the pattern of amino acids we require.

Cardiovascular Protection from Potassium

Goat’s milk is a good source of potassium, an essential mineral for maintaining normal blood pressure and heart function. Since a cup of goat’s milk contains 498.7 mg of potassium and only 121.5 mg of sodium, goat’s milk may help to prevent high blood pressure and protect against atherosclerosis.

The effectiveness of potassium-rich foods in lowering blood pressure has been demonstrated by a number of studies. For example, researchers tracked over 40,000 American male health professionals over four years to determine the effects of diet on blood pressure. Men who ate diets higher in potassium-rich foods had a substantially reduced risk of stroke. A cup of goat’s milk provides 14.2% of the daily value for potassium.

While in the United States, we may think of goat’s milk as a beverage alternative to cow’s milk, in most areas of the world, the opposite is true. Worldwide, more people drink goat’s milk than cow’s milk.

Most people assume goat’s milk will have the same strong musky taste for which goat cheese is famous. Yet, in fact, good quality goat’s milk has a delicious slightly sweet, and sometimes also slightly salty, taste.

The scientific name for goat is Capra hircus.

Goats have played a role in food culture since time immemorial with ancient cave paintings showing the hunting of goats. They are also one of the oldest domesticated animals since the herding of goats is thought to have evolved about 10,000 years ago in the mountains of Iran.

Goat milk and the cheese made from it were revered in ancient Egypt with some pharaohs supposedly having these foods placed among the other treasures in their burial chambers. Goat milk was also widely consumed by the ancient Greeks and Romans. Goat milk has remained popular throughout history and still is consumed on a more extensive basis worldwide than cow’s milk.

References

  • Cheng S, Lyytikainen A, Kroger H, Lamberg-Allardt C, Alen M, Koistinen A, Wang QJ, Suuriniemi M, Suominen H, Mahonen A, Nicholson PH, Ivaska KK, Korpela R, Ohlsson C, Vaananen KH, Tylavsky F. Effects of calcium, dairy product, and vitamin D supplementation on bone mass accrual and body composition in 10-12-y-old girls: a 2-y randomized trial. Am J Clin Nutr. 2005 Nov;82(5):1115-26. PMID:16280447.
  • Elwood PC, Pickering JE, Fehily AM. Milk and dairy consumption, diabetes and the metabolic syndrome: the Caerphilly prospective study. J Epidemiol Community Health. 2007 Aug;61(8):695-8. PMID:17630368.
  • Ensminger AH, Esminger M. K. J. e. al. Food for Health: A Nutrition Encyclopedia. Clovis, California: Pegus Press; 1986. PMID:15210.
  • Gunther CW, Lyle RM, Legowski PA, James JM, McCabe LD, McCabe GP, Peacock M, Teegarden D. Fat oxidation and its relation to serum parathyroid hormone in young women enrolled in a 1-y dairy calcium intervention. Am J Clin Nutr. 2005 Dec;82(6):1228-34. PMID:16332655.
  • Hajjar IM, Grim CE, Kotchen TA. Dietary calcium lowers the age-related rise in blood pressure in the United States: the NHANES III survey. J Clin Hypertens 2003 Mar-2003 Apr 30; 5(2):122-6 2003.
  • Kesse-Guyot E, Bertrais S, Duperray B, Arnault N, Bar-Hen A, Galan P, Hercberg S. Dairy products, calcium and the risk of breast cancer: results of the French SU.VI.MAX prospective study. Ann Nutr Metab. 2007;51(2):139-45. Epub 2007 May 29. PMID:17536191.
  • Wood, Rebecca. The Whole Foods Encyclopedia. New York, NY: Prentice-Hall Press; 1988. PMID:15220.

article from ::  http://www.abundalife.com/goats.asp

Goats’ Milk Is More Beneficial To Health Than Cows’ Milk, Study Suggests

ScienceDaily (July 31, 2007) — Researchers have carried out a comparative study on the properties of goats’ milk compared to those of cows’ milk. They found reason to believe that goats’ milk could help prevent diseases such as anemia and bone demineralization. Goats’ milk was found to help with the digestive and metabolic utilization of minerals such as iron, calcium, phosphorus and magnesium.

Research carried out at the Department of Physiology of the University of Granada has revealed that goat milk has more beneficial properties to health than cow milk. Among these properties it helps to prevent ferropenic anaemia (iron deficiency) and bone demineralisation (softening of the bones).

This project, conducted by Doctor Javier Díaz Castro and directed by professors Margarita Sánchez Campos, Mª Inmaculada López Aliaga and Mª José Muñoz Alférez, focuses on the comparison between the nutritional properties of goat milk and cow milk, both with normal calcium content and calcium enriched, against the bioavailability of iron, calcium, phosphorus and magnesium. To carry out this study, the metabolic balance technique has been used both in rats with experimentally induced nutritional ferropenic anaemia and in a control group of rats.

In order to know how the nutritive utilisation of these minerals may affect their metabolic distribution and destination, the UGR researcher has determined the concentration of these minerals in the different organs involved in their homeostatic regulation and different haematological parameters in relation to the metabolism of the minerals.

Better results with goat milk

Results obtained in the study reveal that ferropenic anaemia and bone demineralisation caused by this pathology have a better recovery with goat milk. Due to the higher bioavailability of iron, calcium, phosphorus and magnesium, the restoration of altered haematological parameters and the better levels of parathyroid hormone (PTH), a hormone that regulates the calcium balance in the organism was found in the rats that consumed this food.

Javier Díaz Castro points out that the inclusion of goat milk with normal or double calcium content in the diet “favours digestive and metabolic utilisation of iron, calcium and phosphorus and their deposit in target organs – parts of the organism to which these minerals are preferably sent – involved in their homeostatic regulation.”

According to this researcher, all these conclusions reveal that regular consumption of goat milk – a natural food with highly beneficial nutritional characteristics – “has positive effects on mineral metabolism, recovery from ferropenic anaemia and bone mineralisation in rats. In addition, and unlike observations in cow milk, its calcium enrichment does not interfere in the bioavailability of the minerals studied.”

Although there is no doubt that these findings may be a base for further in depth study of the multiple health benefits of goat milk, the UGR researcher warns that “studies in humans are still required in order to confirm the findings obtained in rats and to promote goat milk consumption both in the general population and in the population affected by nutritional ferropenic anaemia and pathologies related to bone demineralisation.” Part of the results of this research has been published in the International Dairy Journal and Journal Dairy Science.

article from :: http://www.sciencedaily.com

The Fact of Goat Milk

Infants below the age of one year should not be fed cow milk, goat milk, or soy beverage. These milks are low in iron and differ in the protein composition compared to mothers milk. Since infants depend so much on milk, it is likely that they will develop an iron deficiency if they consume cow, goat or soy beverage. Really, breast feeding or infant formula are the way to go, with breast feeding most superior. The iron in breast milk is highly bio-available and will cover the needs for the infant until about the age of 6 months. After that, the Academy of Pediatricians suggests, infants should be supplemented with iron-fortified infant cereals (such as rice cereal), while ideally breast feeding should be continued until at least the age of one.

Another reason that infants should not be fed cow or goat milk is because of the protein. Breast milk is higher in whey and much lower in casein compared to cow and goat milks. Casein is more difficult to digest than whey and may lead to internal gastrointestinal bleeding, which again, could lead to iron deficiency.

There are also mineral differences among breast milk, cow milk and goat milk. Goat milk, in particular, is low in the B vitamin folic acid.

Soy beverages provide more iron than cow milk. However, soy is deficient in many other key nutrients. Remember, soy is a plant and by no means can be compared to mammal milks, which are complex foods made to grow baby children/animals. The nutritional composition of soy and mammal milks are very different.

At the age of one, the American Academy of Pediatrics suggests children can be switched to whole milk. Again, soy beverage is not equivalent to milk and thus should not replace milk in the diet.

Finally, raw milk should not be fed to infants. Raw milk commonly contains food-borne illness-causing microorganisms (pathogens). Even low levels of certain pathogens can cause illness. Since infant immunological systems are not fully developed, they are at greater risk for disease and death than those with developed immune systems.

The following is presented for your information. It is not intended to endorse or discourage the feeding of any product, milk, or formula to infants, children or adults. As with any web site, this site can not stake a claim to all wisdom on the subject covered.

Please seek additional sources of information before you change anything in your life based on what you read here or anywhere else on the internet.

  • Vitamin comparisons
  • Minerals comparisons
  • Infant recommended daily intake for vitamins
  • Infant recommended daily intake for minerals
  • Distinguishing between allergies and lactose intolerance
  • A note about goat milk digestibility
  • ‘naturally homogenized’
Comparing Milk:  Human, Cow, Goat & Commercial Infant Formula
Nutritive comparisons of milks based on the needs of 0-6 month old infants. *
VITAMIN HUMAN COW GOAT FORMULA * DEFICIENCIES **
A 64 53 56 65 ug/100g
D 0.03 0.03 0.03 0.06 ug/100g All Lo, except F
C 5.0 1.0 1.3 6.1 mg/100g C+G very low
E 0.3 0.7 0.7 0.3 ug/100g
B1 (thiamin) 140 400 480 68 ug/100g
B2  (riboflavin) 36 162 138 101 ug/100g
Pantothenic acid 200 300 300 304 ug/100g
Biotin 0.8 2.0 2.0 3.0 ug/100g all OK
Nicotinic acid (niacin) 200 100 200 710 ug/100g F OK, all other LO, particularly C
Folic Acid 5.2 5.0 1.0 10 ug/100g F OK, others LO, particularly G
Vitamin B12 0.3 0.4 0.1 0.2 ug/100g All LO, particularly G
Vitamin B6 11 42 46 41 ug/100g
Vitamin K

* ug/100g = microgram/100g milk
** Human milk is not considered deficient in any nutrients, but is considered the standard for infant feeding.

HUMAN COW GOAT FORMULA DEFICIENCY
Calcium 34 130 120 49 mg/100g
Chromium
Selenium
Molybdenum
HUMAN COW GOAT FORMULA DEFICIENCY
Protein 1.0 3.3 3.6 2.0 C+G HI
Carbohydrate 6.9 4.7 4.5 7.0 C+G LO
Fat 4.4 3.3 4.1 1.1 Formula LO
Water 87.5 88.0 87.0 80
Calories (kcal) 70 61 69 60
* To compare the milks on a per day basis, /100g values were multiplied by 8 (the average 0-6 month old infant consumes 800 grams of milk/day.
It is important to note that the bioavailability of each vitamin or mineral may differ.  The above numbers do not indicate bioavailability, but research has shown that the iron and B12 in breast milk are significantly more bioavailable than in formula or cow milk (this has not been studied for goat milk).
Infant recommended daily intake for vitamins
Vitamin A 0.4 mg  (400 ug, 1500-2000 IU)
Vitamin D 0.01 mg  (10 ug, 400 IU)
Vitamin C 35 mg  (35000 ug)
Vitamin E 4 mg  (4000 ug)
Vitamin B1 (thiamin) 0.3 mg  (300 ug)
Vitamin B2 (riboflavin) 0.5 mg  (500 ug)
Pantothenic acid 2500 ug
Biotin 40 ug
Niacin 6 mg (6000 ug)
Folic Acid 0.04 mg (40  ug)
Vitamin B12 0.0006  mg (0.6 ug)
Vitamin B6 0.4 mg (400 ug)
Vitamin K 12 ug
Infant recommended daily intake for minerals
Calcium 360 mg
Chloride 275-700 mg
Copper 0.5-0.7 mg
Magnesium 50 mg
Phosphorus 240 mg
Potassium 350-925 mg
Sodium 115-350 mg
Zinc 3 mg
Iron 10 mg
Iodine 40 ug
Manganese 0.5-0.7 mg
Fluoride 0.1-0.5 mg
Chromium 0.01-0.04 mg
Selenium 0.01-0.04 mg
Molybdenum 0.03-0.06 mg

These requirements generally increase after the first 6 months of life.

Infants consume about 750-800 g/day for the first 4-5 months (450-1200g/day range).

Note that most of the minerals in goat and cow milk are significantly higher than in human milk.  This, coupled with the higher protein of cow and goat milks (more than 3% compared to about 1.3%), make dilution necessary so as to avoid hypertonic dehydration (a result of high solutes in urine).  But, after dilution, carbohydrate should be added to cow or goat milk because human milk contains 7.0 g/100g lactose compared to about 4.5 g/100g lactose found in cow and goat milks.

Distinguishing between allergies and lactose intolerance:

Allergies and lactose intolerance are different things.

An allergic reaction is the body’s response to a foreign body (antigen), typically proteins. Goat milk proteins have slightly different amino acid structures than cow milk proteins. Thus, a person who produces antibodies to cow milk proteins, may not produce antibodies to goat milk proteins. However, there is no guarantee that a person who is allergic to cow milk will not be allergic to goat milk, because the milks are similar.

Lactose intolerance or lactose maldigestion result from a person’s inability to completely digest lactose. Because microorganisms in the gut will produce gas, symptoms of lactose intolerance include cramps, flatulence and bloating. Lactose is present in all milks. Thus, goat milk can not successfully be substituted for cow milk in cases of lactose intolerance.

A note about goat milk digestibility:

Goat milk’s tendency to be more easily digested than cow milk is due to its protein make-up. Goat milk has low levels of the protein alpha s1-casein, a protein that is involved in curd formation. Cow milk has higher quantities of alpha s1-casein than goat milk. In fact, some goats naturally produce very little alpha s1-casein. The higher proportion of small milk fat globules present in goat milk compared to cow milk may also contribute to goat milk’s tendency to be more easily digested.

Perhaps you’ve heard that goat milk is ‘naturally homogenized’:

Because fat is lighter than water, the cream portion of milk floats on top of the skim portion of milk. Most cows milks in the store are homogenized so that we do not see the two phases of milk. The milk is forced through tiny pores under high pressure to break the fat into smaller sized globules. Small globules distribute in milk and do not float as readily. One reason goat milk does not have to be homogenized is because it has a high proportion of small fat globules. The other reason is that goat milk lacks the protein agglutinin. Agglutinin makes fat globules stick together and float.

Article from :: http://www.saanendoah.com/compare.html

Got Goat Milk ???

What does goat’s milk give you that cow’s milk doesn’t? In many parts of the world, goat’s milk is preferred to cow’s milk. Even in the United States, the goat is gaining popularity. Goats eat less and occupy less grazing space than cows, and in some families the backyard goat supplies milk for family needs. Goat’s milk is believed to be more easily digestible and less allergenic than cow’s milk. Does it deserve this reputation? Let’s disassemble goat’s milk, nutrient-by-nutrient, to see how it compares with cow’s milk.

Different fat. Goat’s milk contains around ten grams of fat per eight ounces compared to 8 to 9 grams in whole cow’s milk, and it’s much easier to find lowfat and non-fat varieties of cow’s milk than it is to purchase lowfat goat’s milk. Unlike cow’s milk, goat’s milk does not contain agglutinin. As a result, the fat globules in goat’s milk do not cluster together, making them easier to digest. Like cow’s milk, goat’s milk is low in essential fatty acids, because goats also have EFA-destroying bacteria in their ruminant stomachs. Yet, goat milk is reported to contain more of the essential fatty acids linoleic and arachnodonic acids, in addition to a higher proportion of short-chain and medium-chain fatty acids. These are easier for intestinal enzymes to digest.

Different protein. Goat milk protein forms a softer curd (the term given to the protein clumps that are formed by the action of your stomach acid on the protein), which makes the protein more easily and rapidly digestible. Theoretically, this more rapid transit through the stomach could be an advantage to infants and children who regurgitate cow’s milk easily. Goat’s milk may also have advantages when it comes to allergies. Goat’s milk contains only trace amounts of an allergenic casein protein, alpha-S1, found in cow’s milk. Goat’s milk casein is more similar to human milk, yet cow’s milk and goat’s milk contain similar levels of the other allergenic protein, beta lactoglobulin. Scientific studies have not found a decreased incidence of allergy with goat’s milk, but here is another situation where mothers’ observations and scientific studies are at odds with one another. Some mothers are certain that their child tolerates goat’s milk better than cow’s milk, and mothers are more sensitive to children’s reactions than scientific studies.

Less lactose. Goat’s milk contains slightly lower levels of lactose (4.1 percent versus 4.7 percent in cow’s milk), which may be a small advantage in lactose-intolerant persons.

Different minerals. Although the mineral content of goat’s milk and cow’s milk is generally similar, goat’s milk contains 13 percent more calcium, 25 percent more vitamin B-6, 47 percent more vitamin A, 134 percent more potassium, and three times more niacin. It is also four times higher in copper. Goat’s milk also contains 27 percent more of the antioxidant selenium than cow’s milk. Cow’s milk contains five times as much vitamin B-12 as goat’s milk and ten times as much folic acid (12 mcg. in cow’s milk versus 1 mcg. for goat’s milk per eight ounces with an RDA of 75-100 mcg. for children). The fact that goat’s milk contains less than ten percent of the amount of folic acid contained in cow’s milk means that it must be supplemented with folic acid in order to be adequate as a formula or milk substitute for infants and toddlers, and popular brands of goat’s milk may advertise “supplemented with folic acid” on the carton.

GOAT’S MILK FORMULA VERSUS COMMERCIAL FORMULA FOR ALLERGIC INFANTS

Parents of babies allergic to cow’s milk and other commercial formulas often ask if it’s safe to use goat’s milk as an alternative. In theory, goat’s milk is less allergenic and more easily digestible than cow’s milk, but it should not be used as a substitute for infant formula. Like cow’s milk, it can cause intestinal irritation and anemia. If your baby under one year of age is allergic to cow’s milk-based formulas, try either a soy-based formula or a hypoallergenic formula. If your baby can’t tolerate either soy or hypoallergenic formulas, in consultation with your doctor and/or a pediatric nutritionist click here for goat’s milk formula recipe.

This formula has stood the test of time. One batch contains 715 calories and nineteen calories per ounce, which is essentially the same as cow’s milk formulas. This is sufficient for an infant six to twelve months. A baby on goat’s milk formula should also receive a multi-vitamin with iron supplement prescribed by her doctor. In infants over one year of age, goat’s milk can be readily used instead of cow’s milk. (Be sure to buy goat’s milk that is certified free of antiobiotics and bovine growth hormone (BGH). (For more information about goat’s milk call 1-800-891-GOAT)

article from :: http://askdrsears.com/html/3/t032400.asp

The Fact Of Goat Milk

Goat Milk is delicious, and the natural choice for those sensitive to cow milk and/or soy products.

Goat milk plays an important role in the diet of an ever-growing number of people who need and desire a cow or soy milk substitute with superior nutritional benefits and with the taste and richness of real, natural milk.

Worldwide, more people consume goat milk! It’s easier to digest than cow’s milk, higher in calcium, and it’s a wonderful kitchen companion for foods made with milk.

Love milk, but don’t like the tummy trouble? There is a delicious, refreshing glass of goat milk waiting just for you! Approximately one in ten persons who are allergic to cow milk can drink goat milk.

Goat milk is a calcium champ! Your body absorbs calcium more thoroughly when drinking calcium rich milk opposed to using supplement tablets. Goat milk is not only higher in calcium than cow milk, but is easier on sensitive stomachs.

Gourmet cooks love the taste! Its slightly sweet taste has often been described as “hazelnutty,” and its naturally creamy, smooth texture lends itself to a wide variety of delicious dishes … from morning cereal to casseroles, desserts, and ethnic dishes.

The Facts About Goat Milk

  • Goat milk contains only trace amounts of alpha S1 casein—the major protein of cow’s milk to which many people are allergic. Symptoms of cow milk allergy include eczema, diarrhea, gas, bloating, ear infections, and excess mucus.

Goat milk, like all natural milks (including human milk) contains lactose. So why are many so-called lactose intolerant persons able to drink goat milk? It has been hypothesized that because of goat milk’s superior digestibility, less undigested residue is left behind in the colon to ferment and cause the unpleasant symptoms of lactose intolerance. One significant difference from cow milk is found in the composition and structure of fat in goat milk. The average size of goat milk fat globules is about 2 micrometers as compared to 2-1/2 to 3-1/2 micrometers for cow milk fat. These smaller- sized fat globules provide a better dispersion and a more homogenous mixture of fat in the milk.

Article from :: http://meyenberg.com/core

Goat Milk

Milk, goat

Delicious with a slightly sweet and sometimes salty undertone, goat’s milk is the milk of choice in most of the world. Although not popular in the United States, it can be found in markets and health foods stores throughout the year.

Unlike cow’s milk there is no need to homogenize goat’s milk. While the fat globules in cow’s milk tend to separate to the surface, the globules in goat’s milk are much smaller and will remain suspended in solution. When individuals have sensitivity to cow’s milk, goat’s milk can sometimes be used as an alternative.
This chart graphically details the %DV that a serving of Milk, goat provides for each of the nutrients of which it is a good, very good, or excellent source according to our Food Rating System. Additional information about the amount of these nutrients provided by Milk, goat can be found in the Food Rating System Chart. A link that takes you to the In-Depth Nutritional Profile for Milk, goat, featuring information over 80 nutrients, can be found under the Food Rating System Chart.

Health Benefits

Goat’s milk is a very good source of calcium and the amino acid tryptophan. It is also a good source of protein, phosphorus, riboflavin (vitamin B2) and potassium. Perhaps the greatest benefit of goat’s milk, however, is that some people who cannot tolerate cow’s milk are able to drink goat’s milk without any problems. It is not clear from scientific research studies exactly why some people can better tolerate goat’s milk. Some initial studies suggested that specific proteins known to cause allergic reactions may have been present in cow’s milk in significant quantities yet largely absent in goat’s milk. The alpha-casein proteins, including alpha s1-casein, and the beta-casein proteins were both considered in this regard. However, more recent studies suggest that the genetic wiring for these casein proteins is highly variable in both cows and goats and that more study is needed to determine the exact role these proteins might play in the tolerability of goat’s milk versus cow’s milk. Other research has found some anti-inflammatory compounds (short-chain sugar molecules called oligosaccharides) to be present in goat’s milk. These oligosaccharides may make goat’s milk easier to digest, especially in the case of compromised intestinal function. In animal studies, goat’s milk has also been shown to enhance the metabolism of both iron and copper, especially when there are problems with absorption of minerals in the digestive tract. These factors and others are likely to play an important role in the tolerability of goat’s milk versus cow’s milk. Allergy to cow’s milk has been found in many people with conditions such as recurrent ear infections, asthma, eczema, and even rheumatoid arthritis. Replacing cow’s milk with goat’s milk may help to reduce some of the symptoms of these conditions.

Goat’s milk can sometimes even be used as a replacement for cow’s milk-based infant formulas for infants who have difficulties with dairy products. Unfortunately, goat’s milk is lacking in several nutrients that are necessary for growing infants, so parents interested in trying goat’s milk instead of cow’s milk-based formula for their infants should ask their pediatricians or other qualified healthcare practitioners for recipes and ways to add these important and vital nutrients. For older children and adults, however, goat’s milk can be an excellent calcium-rich alternative to cow’s milk as, in addition to calcium, it contains many of the same nutrients found in cow’s milk.

Calcium-A Mineral for A Lot More than Strong Bones

Goat’s milk is a very good source of calcium. Calcium is widely recognized for its role in maintaining the strength and density of bones. In a process known as bone mineralization, calcium and phosphorus join to form calcium phosphate. Calcium phosphate is a major component of the mineral complex (called hydroxyapatite) that gives structure and strength to bones. A cup of goat’s milk supplies 32.6% of the daily value for calcium along with 27.0% of the DV for phosphorus. In comparison, a cup of cow’s milk provides 29.7% of the DV for calcium and 23.2% of the DV for phosphorus.

Building bone is, however, far from all that calcium does for us. In recent studies, this important mineral has been shown to:

  • Help protect colon cells from cancer-causing chemicals
  • Help prevent the bone loss that can occur as a result of menopause or certain conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis
  • Help prevent migraine headaches in those who suffer from them
  • Reduce PMS symptoms during the luteal phase (the second half) of the menstrual cycle

Calcium also plays a role in many other vital physiological activities, including blood clotting, nerve conduction, muscle contraction, regulation of enzyme activity, cell membrane function and blood pressure regulation. Because these activities are essential to life, the body utilizes complex regulatory systems to tightly control the amount of calcium in the blood, so that sufficient calcium is always available. As a result, when dietary intake of calcium is too low to maintain adequate blood levels of calcium, calcium stores are drawn out of the bones to maintain normal blood concentrations.

Dairy Foods Better than Calcium Supplements for Growing Girls’ Bones

For young girls going through the rapid growth spurts of puberty, getting calcium from dairy products, such as goat’s milk, may be better for building bone than taking a calcium supplement, suggests a study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

Finnish researchers enrolled 195 healthy girls aged 10-12 years and divided them into 4 groups. One group was given supplemental calcium (1000 mg) + vitamin D3 (200 IU) each day. The second group received only supplemental calcium (1000 mg/day). The third group ate cheese supplying 1,000 mg of calcium each day, and the fourth group was given a placebo supplement.

At the beginning and end of the study, DEXA (dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry) scans were run to check bone indexes of the hip, spine, and whole body, and the radius and tibia were checked by peripheral quantitative computed tomography.

At the conclusion of the study, girls getting their calcium from cheese had higher whole-body bone mineral density and cortical thickness of the tibia than girls given supplemental calcium + vitamin D, supplemental calcium alone, or placebo. While the researchers noted that differences in the rate at which different children naturally grow might account for some of the differences seen in bone mineral density, they concluded: “Increasing calcium intake by consuming cheese appears to be more beneficial for cortical bone mass accrual than the consumption of tablets containing a similar amount of calcium.”

Calcium-rich Dairy Foods Boost the Body’s Burning of Fat After a Meal

Those ads linking a daily cup of yogurt to a slimmer silhouette may have a real basis in scientific fact. A study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition not only shows a calcium-rich diet is associated with fat loss but may help explain why.

Normal-weight women ranging in age from 18-30 years were randomly assigned to a low (less than 800 mg per day) or high (1000-1400 mg per day) calcium diet for 1 year, and the rate at which their bodies burned fat after a meal was assessed at the beginning and end of the study.

After 1 year, fat oxidation (burning) was 20 times higher in women eating the high calcium diet compared to those in the low-calcium control group (0.10 vs. 0.06 gram per minute).

The women’s blood levels of parathyroid hormone were also checked and were found to correlate with their rate of fat oxidation. (The primary function of parathyroid hormone is to maintain normal levels of calcium in the body. When calcium levels drop too low, parathyroid hormone is secreted to instruct bone cells to release calcium into the bloodstream.)

Higher blood levels of parathyroid hormone were associated with a lower rate of fat oxidation and lower dietary calcium intake, while lower blood levels of parathyroid hormone levels were seen in the women consuming a diet high in calcium, who were burning fat more rapidly after a meal. So, it appears that a high-calcium diet increases fat oxidation, at least in part, by lessening the need for parathyroid hormone secretion, thus keeping blood levels of the hormone low.

Dairy Foods Protective against Metabolic Syndrome

Including goat’s milk and other dairy products in your healthy way of eating may reduce your risk of metabolic syndrome by up to 62%, shows the 20-year Caerphilly prospective study involving 2,375 Welsh men ranging in age from 45-59. Researchers have proposed that conjugated linolenic acid (a healthy fat found in greatest amounts in dairy foods from grass fed cows and goats) may improve insulin action and reduce blood glucose levels. J Epidemiol Community Health. 2007 Aug;61(8):695-8.

Practical Tip: Enjoy a pint of milk and/or a serving of yogurt, cottage cheese or cheese daily. Men who drank a daily pint of milk in the Caerphilly study reduced their risk of metabolic syndrome by 62%. Regular consumption of other dairy products, such as yogurt and cheese, reduced metabolic syndrome risk by 56%.

Dairy Foods’ Calcium Protective against Breast Cancer

When French researchers analyzed the dietary intakes of 3,627 women using five 24-hour records completed over the course of 18 months, those with the highest average dairy intake had a 45% lower risk of developing breast cancer than women with the lowest average intake. When only pre-menopausal women were considered, benefits were even greater; those with the highest average dairy intake had a 65% reduction in breast cancer risk.

Analysis indicates the calcium provided by dairy foods is the reason why. Increasing calcium intake was associated with a 50% reduction in breast cancer risk for the whole population, and a 74% reduction for pre-menopausal women. Ann Nutr Metab. 2007;51(2):139-45. Epub 2007 May 29.

Practical Tip: In addition to foods made from goat’s or sheep’s milk, you can also increase your calcium intake by making sesame seeds; spinach; blackstrap molasses; and collard, turnip or mustard greens, regular additions to your healthy way of eating.

Energy Producing Riboflavin

Goat’s milk is a very good source of riboflavin, a B vitamin important for energy production. Riboflavin (vitamin B2) plays at least two important roles in the body’s energy production. When active in energy production pathways, riboflavin takes the form of flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) or flavin mononucleotide (FMN). In these forms, riboflavin attaches to protein enzymes called flavoproteins that allow oxygen-based energy production to occur. Flavoproteins are found throughout the body, particularly in locations where oxygen-based energy production is constantly needed, such as the heart and other muscles.

Riboflavin’s other role in energy production is protective. The oxygen-containing molecules the body uses to produce energy can be highly reactive and can inadvertently cause damage to the mitochondria (the energy production factories in every cell) and even the cells themselves. In the mitochondria, such damage is largely prevented by a small, protein-like molecule called glutathione. Like many “antioxidant” molecules, glutathione must be constantly recycled, and it is vitamin B2 that allows this recycling to take place. (Technically, vitamin B2 is a cofactor for the enzyme glutathione reductase that reduces the oxidized form of glutathione back to its reduced version.) Riboflavin been shown to be able to reduce the frequency of migraine headaches in people who suffer from them.

One cup of goat’s milk supplies 20.0% of the daily value for riboflavin, comparable to the 23.5% of the DV for riboflavin provided in a cup of cow’s milk.

A Good Source of Protein

Goat’s milk is a good source of low-cost high-quality protein, providing 8.7 grams of protein (17.4% of the daily value for protein) in one cup versus cow’s milk, which provides 8.1 grams or 16.3% of the DV for protein. The structure of humans and animals is built on protein. We rely on animal and vegetable protein for our supply of amino acids, and then our bodies rearrange the nitrogen to create the pattern of amino acids we require.

Cardiovascular Protection from Potassium

Goat’s milk is a good source of potassium, an essential mineral for maintaining normal blood pressure and heart function. Since a cup of goat’s milk contains 498.7 mg of potassium and only 121.5 mg of sodium, goat’s milk may help to prevent high blood pressure and protect against atherosclerosis.

The effectiveness of potassium-rich foods in lowering blood pressure has been demonstrated by a number of studies. For example, researchers tracked over 40,000 American male health professionals over four years to determine the effects of diet on blood pressure. Men who ate diets higher in potassium-rich foods had a substantially reduced risk of stroke. A cup of goat’s milk provides 14.2% of the daily value for potassium.

Description

While in the United States, we may think of goat’s milk as a beverage alternative to cow’s milk, in most areas of the world, the opposite is true. Worldwide, more people drink goat’s milk than cow’s milk.

Most people assume goat’s milk will have the same strong musky taste for which goat cheese is famous. Yet, in fact, good quality goat’s milk has a delicious slightly sweet, and sometimes also slightly salty, taste.

The scientific name for goat is Capra hircus.

History

Goats have played a role in food culture since time immemorial with ancient cave paintings showing the hunting of goats. They are also one of the oldest domesticated animals since the herding of goats is thought to have evolved about 10,000 years ago in the mountains of Iran.

Goat milk and the cheese made from it were revered in ancient Egypt with some pharaohs supposedly having these foods placed among the other treasures in their burial chambers. Goat milk was also widely consumed by the ancient Greeks and Romans. Goat milk has remained popular throughout history and still is consumed on a more extensive basis worldwide than cow’s milk.

How to Select and Store

When purchasing goat’s milk, always use the “sell-by” date as a guide to the shelf life of the goat’s milk. Smell the top of the container to make sure that the milk does not smell of spoilage, which could have been caused by being stored for a period of time outside of the refrigerator. Select goat’s milk from the coldest part of the refrigerator case, which is usually the lower section.

Goat’s milk should always be refrigerated since higher temperatures can cause it to turn sour rather quickly. Always seal or close the milk container when storing it to prevent it from absorbing the aromas of other foods in the refrigerator. Avoid storing goat’s milk in the refrigerator door since this exposes it to too much heat each time the refrigerator is opened and closed.

How to Enjoy

For some of our favorite recipes, click Recipes.

A Few Quick Serving Ideas:

Next time you want a glass of milk, try goat’s milk instead.

Goat’s milk yogurt makes a wonderful base for savory dips. Simply mix in your favorite herbs and spices and serve with crudité.

Crumble some goat’s cheese on a salad of romaine lettuce, pears and pumpkin seeds.

Crumbled goat cheese is a wonderful rich topping for split pea soup.

Add extra taste and protein to a vegetable sandwich by including some goat’s cheese.

Soft, spreadable goat cheese is an exceptional accompaniment to crusty whole grain bread or crackers and fruit.

Top sliced tomatoes with crumpled goat cheese and fresh basil. Drizzle with balsamic vinegar and extra virgin olive oil.

Individual Concerns

Lactose Intolerance

Goat’s milk, like cow’s milk, contains the milk sugar, lactose, and may produce adverse reactions in lactose-intolerant individuals. (Goat’s milk is only slightly lower in lactose than cow’s milk, with 4.1% milk solids as lactose versus 4.7% in cow’s milk.)

Nutritional Profile

Goat’s milk is a very good source of calcium. It is also a good source of phosphorus, riboflavin (vitamin B2), protein and potassium.

For an in-depth nutritional profile click here: Goat’s Milk.

In-Depth Nutritional Profile

In addition to the nutrients highlighted in our ratings chart, an in-depth nutritional profile for Milk, goat is also available. This profile includes information on a full array of nutrients, including carbohydrates, sugar, soluble and insoluble fiber, sodium, vitamins, minerals, fatty acids, amino acids and more.

Introduction to Food Rating System Chart

In order to better help you identify foods that feature a high concentration of nutrients for the calories they contain, we created a Food Rating System. This system allows us to highlight the foods that are especially rich in particular nutrients. The following chart shows the nutrients for which this food is either an excellent, very good, or good source (below the chart you will find a table that explains these qualifications). If a nutrient is not listed in the chart, it does not necessarily mean that the food doesn’t contain it. It simply means that the nutrient is not provided in a sufficient amount or concentration to meet our rating criteria. (To view this food’s in-depth nutritional profile that includes values for dozens of nutrients – not just the ones rated as excellent, very good, or good – please use the link below the chart.) To read this chart accurately, you’ll need to glance up in the top left corner where you will find the name of the food and the serving size we used to calculate the food’s nutrient composition. This serving size will tell you how much of the food you need to eat to obtain the amount of nutrients found in the chart. Now, returning to the chart itself, you can look next to the nutrient name in order to find the nutrient amount it offers, the percent Daily Value (DV%) that this amount represents, the nutrient density that we calculated for this food and nutrient, and the rating we established in our rating system. For most of our nutrient ratings, we adopted the government standards for food labeling that are found in the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s “Reference Values for Nutrition Labeling.” Read more background information and details of our rating system.

Goat’s milk
1.00 cup
244.00 grams
167.90 calories
Nutrient Amount DV
(%)
Nutrient
Density
World’s Healthiest
Foods Rating
tryptophan 0.11 g 34.4 3.7 very good
calcium 325.74 mg 32.6 3.5 very good
phosphorus 270.11 mg 27.0 2.9 good
vitamin B2 (riboflavin) 0.34 mg 20.0 2.1 good
protein 8.69 g 17.4 1.9 good
potassium 498.74 mg 14.2 1.5 good
World’s Healthiest
Foods Rating
Rule
excellent DV>=75% OR Density>=7.6 AND DV>=10%
very good DV>=50% OR Density>=3.4 AND DV>=5%
good DV>=25% OR Density>=1.5 AND DV>=2.5%

In-Depth Nutritional Profile for Milk, goat

References

  • Cheng S, Lyytikainen A, Kroger H, Lamberg-Allardt C, Alen M, Koistinen A, Wang QJ, Suuriniemi M, Suominen H, Mahonen A, Nicholson PH, Ivaska KK, Korpela R, Ohlsson C, Vaananen KH, Tylavsky F. Effects of calcium, dairy product, and vitamin D supplementation on bone mass accrual and body composition in 10-12-y-old girls: a 2-y randomized trial. Am J Clin Nutr. 2005 Nov;82(5):1115-26. 2005. PMID:16280447.
  • Elwood PC, Pickering JE, Fehily AM. Milk and dairy consumption, diabetes and the metabolic syndrome: the Caerphilly prospective study. J Epidemiol Community Health. 2007 Aug;61(8):695-8. 2007. PMID:17630368.
  • Ensminger AH, Esminger M. K. J. e. al. Food for Health: A Nutrition Encyclopedia. Clovis, California: Pegus Press; 1986 1986. PMID:15210.
  • Gunther CW, Lyle RM, Legowski PA, James JM, McCabe LD, McCabe GP, Peacock M, Teegarden D. Fat oxidation and its relation to serum parathyroid hormone in young women enrolled in a 1-y dairy calcium intervention. Am J Clin Nutr. 2005 Dec;82(6):1228-34. 2005. PMID:16332655.
  • Hajjar IM, Grim CE, Kotchen TA. Dietary calcium lowers the age-related rise in blood pressure in the United States: the NHANES III survey. J Clin Hypertens 2003 Mar-2003 Apr 30; 5(2):122-6 2003.
  • Kesse-Guyot E, Bertrais S, Duperray B, Arnault N, Bar-Hen A, Galan P, Hercberg S. Dairy products, calcium and the risk of breast cancer: results of the French SU.VI.MAX prospective study. Ann Nutr Metab. 2007;51(2):139-45. Epub 2007 May 29. 2007. PMID:17536191.
  • Wood, Rebecca. The Whole Foods Encyclopedia. New York, NY: Prentice-Hall Press; 1988 1988. PMID:15220.

More of the World’s Healthiest Foods (& Spices)!

articles from http://www.whfoods.com/