THE AMAZING BENEFITS of GOAT MILK PRODUCTS

Goat milk is as close to a perfect food as possible in nature. Its chemical structure is amazingly similar to mother’s milk. It is a complete protein containing all the essential amino acids without the heavy fat content and catarrh producing materials of cow’s milk.

If you have been around farms, you would notice goats are much more flexible and limber than cows. They can climb and do things that are beautiful to watch. I have seen goats get on the roofs of barns and houses and wondered how it was possible. the reason for this is that goats are a bioorganic sodium animal, while cows are a calcium animal.

Bioorganic sodium in known in Naturopathic Medicine as the youth element. Arthritis does not come with old age. It is a lack of this essential mineral that brings on the symptoms of old age.The highest sources of bioorganic sodium is found in goat milk and sweet goat whey. Abunda Life Goat Milk products contain both quick dried goat milk and the whey. It is the sodium that keeps the goats young, active, flexible, and limber all of their lives. There are no old goats in the human sense. They can climb, jump, leap, and walk all of their lives because bioorganic sodium is the joining mobilizing material that makes this possible.

Each organ of the body has a reserve of one chemical element more than others. It holds certain chemical elements so that it is a unique active organ. This principle, known as “The Chemical Story,” is one of the essential principles of Naturopathic Medicine.

Dr. Koenig of Germany, in autopsy after autopsy, discovered that there is more sodium stored in the stomach than any other organ of the body. The stomach is known as a bioorganic sodium organ in naturopathic medicine. When the body becomes deficient in bioorganic sodium foods do not digest properly. The stomach’s ability to produce enzymes and hydrochloric acid is slowed down and we experience belching, bloating, and ulcers become possible along with many other digestive problems. Coffee, tea, sugar, white flour products, chocolate, alcohol, and especially soda drinking produces a high stomach acid imbalance that sucks the bioorganic sodium right off the walls of the stomach and colon. This condition sometimes takes many years to manifest itself and is not noticed until it becomes a named disease. It is for this reason that we do not permit soda in the house at Abunda Life.

The endless array of mindless over-the-counter drugs like Tums, Pepto Bismal, and bicarbonite of soda, as you may well know, is the wrong type of sodium. Like all drugs, without exception, cause more long term problems than short term solutions. In naturopathic medicine we believe that God provided the answer in Food Medicine. Goat milk and goat whey are natural food medicines designed to both nourish and heal, prevent and treat the stomach, colon, intestines, and arthritic like conditions.

I’ve seen goat milk perform wonders at Abunda Life Clinic with both children and adults. I have seen people who could not digest a single food come back to health with goat milk. Many mothers have thrown out the plastic mixes called baby formulas to have their children grow strong and healthy without drugging them and without heavy mucus that cows milk often produces. Some people have resurrected from the dead with goat milk.

Dr. Jensen told me that Ghandi was always able to rapidly come back to excellent health after his very prolonged fasts because of goat milk. Goat milk is one of the best food medicines for rebuilding the brain, nervous sytem, and mental faculties. Goat milk is one of the finest foods for regenerating the cells of the body and bringing a person back to health.

After mother’s milk, goat milk is the ideal food for weaning a child. It is the nearest to mother’s milk in composition, nutrients, and natural chemical properties. It is easy to digest and is a magnificent bodybuilding food. Its fat globules are one ninth the size as cow’s milk, making it easier to digest. If you don’t homogenize cow’s milk you must remove some of the cream. With goats milk this is not neccessary as it is naturally homogenized.

One common denominator that Dr. Jensen discovered in his 70 year study of people over the age of 100, in visiting 90 countries, was goat milk. Margaret Patton of London died at 137 years old. Jonathan Hartop walks 9 miles a day at the age of 136 and lived to be 138. Thomas Parr lived 152 years and Peter Czartin from Austria live to be 184. All lived on goat milk. This is not surprising to some who realize that the only milk referred to in the Bible, as food, is goat milk (Proverbs 27:27).

  • Abunda Life Goat Milk is not only highly nutritious, but is so delicious that children love it. One 12 ounce container makes 2 gallons or 8 quarts or 32 eight ounce glasses of reconstituted goat milk.
  • Abunda Life’s Goat Milk is so highly nutritous that it can often serve as a meal substitute or healthy snack in itself. It is so delicious that children and adults love it. Goat milk is the number one substitute for cow milk made by most Naturopathic Doctors for the following reasons:
    1. Goat milk is a highly comabtible nourishing natural food for people who are allergic to cow milk.
    2. Cow milk is mucus forming to many people. Goat milk is not only non-mucus forming, but actually helps to neutralize mucus.
    3. The fat content in goat milk is very low compared to cow milk. The fat globules are 1/9 the size of cow milk making it a very easy natural food to break down.
    4. Certain ethnic groups, especially Jews and Blacks and some Hispanics are lactate intolerant, which means that their bodies can react adversly to cow milk and cow milk products. For these people goat milk can be the perfect substitute
    5. The chemical structure of goat milk is very close to that of mother’s milk.
    6. The elements of goat milk are similar to those found in the stomach, colon, intestines, and joints. Thereby making goat milk the perfect food for these symptoms.
    7. Goat milk digests easily making it the perfect food for children, the elderly, those with digestive difficulties, those recuperating from a disease or health conditions, and your pets that have been weaned from their mother.
    8. Goat milk neutralizes acids and toxins.
    9. Goat milk is high in healing enzymes and has a superior form of calcium than cow milk.
    10. Goat milk is compatible with most Abunda Life powder formulas.
QUESTION 1: What are the health benefits of
goat milk over cow milk?
QUESTION 2: Can we use goat milk if we are sensitive to cow milk?

A. One of the more significant differences from cow milk is found in the composition and structure of fat in goat milk. The average size of goat milk fat globules is about 2 micrometers, as compared to 2 1/2 – 3 1/2 micrometers for cow milk fat. These smaller sized fat globules provide a better dispersion, and a more homogeneous mixture of fat in the milk. Research indicates that there is more involved to the creaming ability of milk than merely physical size of the fat globules.

It appears that their clustering is favored by the presence of an agglutinin in milk which is lacking in goat milk, therefore creating a poor creaming ability, especially at lower temperatures. The natural homogenization of goat milk is, from a human health standpoint, much better than the mechanically homogenized cow milk product. It appears that when fat globules are forcibly broken up by mechanical means, it allows an enzyme associated with milk fat, known as xanthine oxidase to become free and penetrate the intestinal wall.

Once xanthine oxidase gets through the intestinal wall and into the bloodstream, it is capable of creating scar damage to the heart and arteries, which in turn may stimulate the body to release cholesterol into the blood in an attempt to lay a protective fatty material on the scarred areas. This can lead to arteriosclerosis.

It should be noted that this effect is not a problem with natural (unhomogenized) cow milk. In unhomogenized milk this enzyme is normally excreted from the body without much absorption. (I.E. milk that comes as God naturally made it is best for you and not the man handled and distorted version of milk.. .this is my opinion).

Another significant difference from cow milk is the higher amount of shorter-chain fatty acids in the milk fat of goats. Furthermore, glycerol ethers are much higher in goat then in cow milk which appears to be important for the nutrition of the nursing newborn.

Goat milk also has lower contents of orotic acid which can be significant in the prevention of fatty liver syndrome. However, the membranes around fat globules in goat milk are more fragile which may be related to their greater susceptibility to develop off flavors than cow milk

goat cow human
fat % 3.8 3.6 4.0
solids-not-fat % 8.9 9.0 8.9
lactose % 4.1 4.7 6.9
nitrogen x 6.38% 3.4 3.2 1.2
protein % 3.0 3.0 1.1
casein % 2.4 2.6 0.4
calcium % CaO 0.19 0.18 0.04
phosphorus P2O5 % .27 .23 .06
chloride % .15 .10 .06
iron (P/100,000) .07 .08 .2
vitamin A (i.u./g fat) 39.0 21.0 32.0
vitamin B (ug/100 m) 68.0 45.0 17.0
riboflavin (ug/100ml) 210.0 159.0 26.0
vitamin C (mg asc. a/100ml) 2.0 2.0 3.0
vitamin D (i.u./g fat) .07 0.7 0.3
Calories /100ml 70.0 69.0 68.0

Goat’s milk is a very good source of calcium and the amino acid tryptophan. It is also a good source of protein, phosphorous, riboflavin (vitamin B2) and potassium. Perhaps the greatest benefit of goat’s milk, however, is that some people who cannot tolerate cow’s milk are able to drink goat’s milk without any problems.

It is not clear from scientific research studies exactly why some people can better tolerate goat’s milk. Some initial studies suggested that specific proteins known to cause allergic reactions may have been present in cow’s milk in significant quantities yet largely absent in goat’s milk. The alpha-casein proteins, including alpha s1-casein, and the beta-casein proteins were both considered in this regard. However, more recent studies suggest that the genetic wiring for these casein proteins is highly variable in both cows and goats and that more study is needed to determine the exact role these proteins might play in the tolerability of goat’s milk versus cow’s milk. Other research has found some anti-inflammatory compounds (short-chain sugar molecules called oligosaccharides) to be present in goat’s milk.

These oligosaccharides may make goat’s milk easier to digest, especially in the case of compromised intestinal function. In animal studies, goat’s milk has also been shown to enhance the metabolism of both iron and copper, especially when there are problems with absorption of minerals in the digestive tract. These factors and others are likely to play an important role in the tolerability of goat’s milk versus cow’s milk. Allergy to cow’s milk has been found in many people with conditions such as recurrent ear infections, asthma, eczema, and even rheumatoid arthr

itis. Replacing cow’s milk with goat’s milk may help to reduce some of the symptoms of these conditions.

Goat’s milk can sometimes even be used as a replacement for cow’s milk-based infant formulas for infants who have difficulties with dairy products. Unfortunately, goat’s milk is lacking in several nutrients that are necessary for growing infants, so parents interested in trying goat’s milk instead of cow’s milk-based formula for their infants should ask their pediatricians or other qualified healthcare practitioners for recipes and ways to add these important and vital nutrients. For older children and adults, however, goat’s milk can be an excellent calcium-rich alternative to cow’s milk as, in addition to calcium, it contains many of the same nutrients found in cow’s milk.

CALCIUM
A Mineral for a lot More than Strong Bones

Goat’s milk is a very good source of calcium. Calcium is widely recognized for its role in maintaining the strength and density of bones. In a process known as bone mineralization, calcium and phosphorous join to form calcium phosphate. Calcium phosphate is a major component of the mineral complex (called hydroxyapatite) that gives structure and strength to bones. A cup of goat’s milk supplies 32.6% of the daily value for calcium along with 27.0% of the DV for phosphorus. In comparison, a cup of cow’s milk provides 29.7% of the DV for calcium and 23.2% of the DV for phosphorus.

Building bone is, however, far from all that calcium does for us. In recent studies, this important mineral has been shown to:

  • Help protect colon cells from cancer-causing chemicals
  • Help prevent the bone loss that can occur as a result of menopause or certain conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis
  • Help prevent migraine headaches in those who suffer from them
  • Reduce PMS symptoms during the luteal phase (the second half) of the menstrual cycle

Calcium also plays a role in many other vital physiological activities, including blood clotting, nerve conduction, muscle contraction, regulation of enzyme activity, cell membrane function and blood pressure regulation. Because these activities are essential to life, the body utilizes complex regulatory systems to tightly control the amount of calcium in the blood, so that sufficient calcium is always available.

As a result, when dietary intake of calcium is too low to maintain adequate blood levels of calcium, calcium stores are drawn out of the bones to maintain normal blood concentrations.

Dairy Foods Better than Calcium
Supplements for Growing Girls’ Bones

For young girls going through the rapid growth spurts of puberty, getting calcium from dairy products, such as goat’s milk, may be better for building bone than taking a calcium supplement, suggests a study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

Finnish researchers enrolled 195 healthy girls aged 10-12 years and divided them into 4 groups. One group was given supplemental calcium (1000 mg) + vitamin D3 (200 IU) each day. The second group received only supplemental calcium (1000 mg/day). The third group ate cheese supplying 1,000 mg of calcium each day, and the fourth group was given a placebo supplement.

At the beginning and end of the study, DEXA (dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry) scans were run to check bone indexes of the hip, spine, and whole body, and the radius and tibia were checked by peripheral quantitative computed tomography.

At the conclusion of the study, girls getting their calcium from cheese had higher whole-body bone mineral density and cortical thickness of the tibia than girls given supplemental calcium + vitamin D, supplemental calcium alone, or placebo. While the researchers noted that differences in the rate at which different children naturally grow might account for some of the differences seen in bone mineral density, they concluded: “Increasing calcium intake by consuming cheese appears to be more beneficial for cortical bone mass accrual than the consumption of tablets containing a similar amount of calcium.”

CALCIUM RICH DAIRY FOODS
Boost the Body’s Burning of Fat After a Meal

Those ads linking a daily cup of yogurt to a slimmer silhouette may have a real basis in scientific fact. A study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition not only shows a calcium-rich diet is associated with fat loss but may help explain why.

Normal-weight women ranging in age from 18-30 years were randomly assigned to a low (less than 800 mg per day) or high (1000-1400 mg per day) calcium diet for 1 year, and the rate at which their bodies burned fat after a meal was assessed at the beginning and end of the study.

After 1 year, fat oxidation (burning) was 20 times higher in women eating the high calcium diet compared to those in the low-calcium control group (0.10 vs. 0.06 gram per minute).

The women’s blood levels of parathyroid hormone were also checked and were found to correlate with their rate of fat oxidation. (The primary function of parathyroid hormone is to maintain normal levels of calcium in the body. When calcium levels drop too low, parathyroid hormone is secreted to instruct bone cells to release calcium into the bloodstream.)

Higher blood levels of parathyroid hormone were associated with a lower rate of fat oxidation and lower dietary calcium intake, while lower blood levels of parathyroid hormone levels were seen in the women consuming a diet high in calcium, who were burning fat more rapidly after a meal. So, it appears that a high-calcium diet increases fat oxidation, at least in part, by lessening the need for parathyroid hormone secretion, thus keeping blood levels of the hormone low.

Dairy Foods Protective AGAINST Metabolic Syndrome

Including goat’s milk and other dairy products in your healthy way of eating may reduce your risk of metabolic syndrome by up to 62%, shows the 20-year Caerphilly prospective study involving 2,375 Welsh men ranging in age from 45-59. Researchers have proposed that conjugated linolenic acid (a healthy fat found in greatest amounts in dairy foods from grass fed cows and goats) may improve insulin action and reduce blood glucose levels.
J Epidemiol Community Health. 2007 Aug;61(8):695-8.

Practical Tip: Enjoy a pint of milk and/or a serving of yogurt, cottage cheese or cheese daily. Men who drank a daily pint of milk in the Caerphilly study reduced their risk of metabolic syndrome by 62%. Regular consumption of other dairy products, such as yogurt and cheese, reduced metabolic syndrome risk by 56%.

Dairy Foods’ Calcium Protective against Breast Cancer

When French researchers analyzed the dietary intakes of 3,627 women using five 24-hour records completed over the course of 18 months, those with the highest average dairy intake had a 45% lower risk of developing breast cancer than women with the lowest average intake. When only pre-menopausal women were considered, benefits were even greater; those with the highest average dairy intake had a 65% reduction in breast cancer risk.

Analysis indicates the calcium provided by dairy foods is the reason why. Increasing calcium intake was associated with a 50% reduction in breast cancer risk for the whole population, and a 74% reduction for pre-menopausal women. Ann Nutr Metab. 2007;51(2):139-45. Epub 2007 May 29.

Energy Producing Riboflavin

Goat’s milk is a very good source of riboflavin, a B vitamin important for energy production. Riboflavin (vitamin B2) plays at least two important roles in the body’s energy production. When active in energy production pathways, riboflavin takes the form of flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) or flavin mononucleotide (FMN). In these forms, riboflavin attaches to protein enzymes called flavoproteins that allow oxygen-based energy production to occur. Flavoproteins are found throughout the body, particularly in locations where oxygen-based energy production is constantly needed, such as the heart and other muscles.

Riboflavin’s other role in energy production is protective. The oxygen-containing molecules the body uses to produce energy can be highly reactive and can inadvertently cause damage to the mitochondria (the energy production factories in every cell) and even the cells themselves. In the mitochondria, such damage is largely prevented by a small, protein-like molecule called glutathione. Like many “antioxidant” molecules, glutathione must be constantly recycled, and it is vitamin B2 that allows this recycling to take place. (Technically, vitamin B2 is a cofactor for the enzyme glutathione reductase that reduces the oxidized form of glutathione back to its reduced version.) Riboflavin been shown to be able to reduce the frequency of migraine headaches in people who suffer from them.

One cup of goat’s milk supplies 20.0% of the daily value for riboflavin, comparable to the 23.5% of the DV for riboflavin provided in a cup of cow’s milk.

A Good Source of Protein

Goat’s milk is a good source of low-cost high-quality protein, providing 8.7 grams of protein (17.4% of the daily value for protein) in one cup versus cow’s milk, which provides 8.1 grams or 16.3% of the DV for protein. The structure of humans and animals is built on protein. We rely on animal and vegetable protein for our supply of amino acids, and then our bodies rearrange the nitrogen to create the pattern of amino acids we require.

Cardiovascular Protection from Potassium

Goat’s milk is a good source of potassium, an essential mineral for maintaining normal blood pressure and heart function. Since a cup of goat’s milk contains 498.7 mg of potassium and only 121.5 mg of sodium, goat’s milk may help to prevent high blood pressure and protect against atherosclerosis.

The effectiveness of potassium-rich foods in lowering blood pressure has been demonstrated by a number of studies. For example, researchers tracked over 40,000 American male health professionals over four years to determine the effects of diet on blood pressure. Men who ate diets higher in potassium-rich foods had a substantially reduced risk of stroke. A cup of goat’s milk provides 14.2% of the daily value for potassium.

While in the United States, we may think of goat’s milk as a beverage alternative to cow’s milk, in most areas of the world, the opposite is true. Worldwide, more people drink goat’s milk than cow’s milk.

Most people assume goat’s milk will have the same strong musky taste for which goat cheese is famous. Yet, in fact, good quality goat’s milk has a delicious slightly sweet, and sometimes also slightly salty, taste.

The scientific name for goat is Capra hircus.

Goats have played a role in food culture since time immemorial with ancient cave paintings showing the hunting of goats. They are also one of the oldest domesticated animals since the herding of goats is thought to have evolved about 10,000 years ago in the mountains of Iran.

Goat milk and the cheese made from it were revered in ancient Egypt with some pharaohs supposedly having these foods placed among the other treasures in their burial chambers. Goat milk was also widely consumed by the ancient Greeks and Romans. Goat milk has remained popular throughout history and still is consumed on a more extensive basis worldwide than cow’s milk.

References

  • Cheng S, Lyytikainen A, Kroger H, Lamberg-Allardt C, Alen M, Koistinen A, Wang QJ, Suuriniemi M, Suominen H, Mahonen A, Nicholson PH, Ivaska KK, Korpela R, Ohlsson C, Vaananen KH, Tylavsky F. Effects of calcium, dairy product, and vitamin D supplementation on bone mass accrual and body composition in 10-12-y-old girls: a 2-y randomized trial. Am J Clin Nutr. 2005 Nov;82(5):1115-26. PMID:16280447.
  • Elwood PC, Pickering JE, Fehily AM. Milk and dairy consumption, diabetes and the metabolic syndrome: the Caerphilly prospective study. J Epidemiol Community Health. 2007 Aug;61(8):695-8. PMID:17630368.
  • Ensminger AH, Esminger M. K. J. e. al. Food for Health: A Nutrition Encyclopedia. Clovis, California: Pegus Press; 1986. PMID:15210.
  • Gunther CW, Lyle RM, Legowski PA, James JM, McCabe LD, McCabe GP, Peacock M, Teegarden D. Fat oxidation and its relation to serum parathyroid hormone in young women enrolled in a 1-y dairy calcium intervention. Am J Clin Nutr. 2005 Dec;82(6):1228-34. PMID:16332655.
  • Hajjar IM, Grim CE, Kotchen TA. Dietary calcium lowers the age-related rise in blood pressure in the United States: the NHANES III survey. J Clin Hypertens 2003 Mar-2003 Apr 30; 5(2):122-6 2003.
  • Kesse-Guyot E, Bertrais S, Duperray B, Arnault N, Bar-Hen A, Galan P, Hercberg S. Dairy products, calcium and the risk of breast cancer: results of the French SU.VI.MAX prospective study. Ann Nutr Metab. 2007;51(2):139-45. Epub 2007 May 29. PMID:17536191.
  • Wood, Rebecca. The Whole Foods Encyclopedia. New York, NY: Prentice-Hall Press; 1988. PMID:15220.

article from ::  http://www.abundalife.com/goats.asp

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Goats’ Milk Is More Beneficial To Health Than Cows’ Milk, Study Suggests

ScienceDaily (July 31, 2007) — Researchers have carried out a comparative study on the properties of goats’ milk compared to those of cows’ milk. They found reason to believe that goats’ milk could help prevent diseases such as anemia and bone demineralization. Goats’ milk was found to help with the digestive and metabolic utilization of minerals such as iron, calcium, phosphorus and magnesium.

Research carried out at the Department of Physiology of the University of Granada has revealed that goat milk has more beneficial properties to health than cow milk. Among these properties it helps to prevent ferropenic anaemia (iron deficiency) and bone demineralisation (softening of the bones).

This project, conducted by Doctor Javier Díaz Castro and directed by professors Margarita Sánchez Campos, Mª Inmaculada López Aliaga and Mª José Muñoz Alférez, focuses on the comparison between the nutritional properties of goat milk and cow milk, both with normal calcium content and calcium enriched, against the bioavailability of iron, calcium, phosphorus and magnesium. To carry out this study, the metabolic balance technique has been used both in rats with experimentally induced nutritional ferropenic anaemia and in a control group of rats.

In order to know how the nutritive utilisation of these minerals may affect their metabolic distribution and destination, the UGR researcher has determined the concentration of these minerals in the different organs involved in their homeostatic regulation and different haematological parameters in relation to the metabolism of the minerals.

Better results with goat milk

Results obtained in the study reveal that ferropenic anaemia and bone demineralisation caused by this pathology have a better recovery with goat milk. Due to the higher bioavailability of iron, calcium, phosphorus and magnesium, the restoration of altered haematological parameters and the better levels of parathyroid hormone (PTH), a hormone that regulates the calcium balance in the organism was found in the rats that consumed this food.

Javier Díaz Castro points out that the inclusion of goat milk with normal or double calcium content in the diet “favours digestive and metabolic utilisation of iron, calcium and phosphorus and their deposit in target organs – parts of the organism to which these minerals are preferably sent – involved in their homeostatic regulation.”

According to this researcher, all these conclusions reveal that regular consumption of goat milk – a natural food with highly beneficial nutritional characteristics – “has positive effects on mineral metabolism, recovery from ferropenic anaemia and bone mineralisation in rats. In addition, and unlike observations in cow milk, its calcium enrichment does not interfere in the bioavailability of the minerals studied.”

Although there is no doubt that these findings may be a base for further in depth study of the multiple health benefits of goat milk, the UGR researcher warns that “studies in humans are still required in order to confirm the findings obtained in rats and to promote goat milk consumption both in the general population and in the population affected by nutritional ferropenic anaemia and pathologies related to bone demineralisation.” Part of the results of this research has been published in the International Dairy Journal and Journal Dairy Science.

article from :: http://www.sciencedaily.com

The Fact of Goat Milk

Infants below the age of one year should not be fed cow milk, goat milk, or soy beverage. These milks are low in iron and differ in the protein composition compared to mothers milk. Since infants depend so much on milk, it is likely that they will develop an iron deficiency if they consume cow, goat or soy beverage. Really, breast feeding or infant formula are the way to go, with breast feeding most superior. The iron in breast milk is highly bio-available and will cover the needs for the infant until about the age of 6 months. After that, the Academy of Pediatricians suggests, infants should be supplemented with iron-fortified infant cereals (such as rice cereal), while ideally breast feeding should be continued until at least the age of one.

Another reason that infants should not be fed cow or goat milk is because of the protein. Breast milk is higher in whey and much lower in casein compared to cow and goat milks. Casein is more difficult to digest than whey and may lead to internal gastrointestinal bleeding, which again, could lead to iron deficiency.

There are also mineral differences among breast milk, cow milk and goat milk. Goat milk, in particular, is low in the B vitamin folic acid.

Soy beverages provide more iron than cow milk. However, soy is deficient in many other key nutrients. Remember, soy is a plant and by no means can be compared to mammal milks, which are complex foods made to grow baby children/animals. The nutritional composition of soy and mammal milks are very different.

At the age of one, the American Academy of Pediatrics suggests children can be switched to whole milk. Again, soy beverage is not equivalent to milk and thus should not replace milk in the diet.

Finally, raw milk should not be fed to infants. Raw milk commonly contains food-borne illness-causing microorganisms (pathogens). Even low levels of certain pathogens can cause illness. Since infant immunological systems are not fully developed, they are at greater risk for disease and death than those with developed immune systems.

The following is presented for your information. It is not intended to endorse or discourage the feeding of any product, milk, or formula to infants, children or adults. As with any web site, this site can not stake a claim to all wisdom on the subject covered.

Please seek additional sources of information before you change anything in your life based on what you read here or anywhere else on the internet.

  • Vitamin comparisons
  • Minerals comparisons
  • Infant recommended daily intake for vitamins
  • Infant recommended daily intake for minerals
  • Distinguishing between allergies and lactose intolerance
  • A note about goat milk digestibility
  • ‘naturally homogenized’
Comparing Milk:  Human, Cow, Goat & Commercial Infant Formula
Nutritive comparisons of milks based on the needs of 0-6 month old infants. *
VITAMIN HUMAN COW GOAT FORMULA * DEFICIENCIES **
A 64 53 56 65 ug/100g
D 0.03 0.03 0.03 0.06 ug/100g All Lo, except F
C 5.0 1.0 1.3 6.1 mg/100g C+G very low
E 0.3 0.7 0.7 0.3 ug/100g
B1 (thiamin) 140 400 480 68 ug/100g
B2  (riboflavin) 36 162 138 101 ug/100g
Pantothenic acid 200 300 300 304 ug/100g
Biotin 0.8 2.0 2.0 3.0 ug/100g all OK
Nicotinic acid (niacin) 200 100 200 710 ug/100g F OK, all other LO, particularly C
Folic Acid 5.2 5.0 1.0 10 ug/100g F OK, others LO, particularly G
Vitamin B12 0.3 0.4 0.1 0.2 ug/100g All LO, particularly G
Vitamin B6 11 42 46 41 ug/100g
Vitamin K

* ug/100g = microgram/100g milk
** Human milk is not considered deficient in any nutrients, but is considered the standard for infant feeding.

HUMAN COW GOAT FORMULA DEFICIENCY
Calcium 34 130 120 49 mg/100g
Chromium
Selenium
Molybdenum
HUMAN COW GOAT FORMULA DEFICIENCY
Protein 1.0 3.3 3.6 2.0 C+G HI
Carbohydrate 6.9 4.7 4.5 7.0 C+G LO
Fat 4.4 3.3 4.1 1.1 Formula LO
Water 87.5 88.0 87.0 80
Calories (kcal) 70 61 69 60
* To compare the milks on a per day basis, /100g values were multiplied by 8 (the average 0-6 month old infant consumes 800 grams of milk/day.
It is important to note that the bioavailability of each vitamin or mineral may differ.  The above numbers do not indicate bioavailability, but research has shown that the iron and B12 in breast milk are significantly more bioavailable than in formula or cow milk (this has not been studied for goat milk).
Infant recommended daily intake for vitamins
Vitamin A 0.4 mg  (400 ug, 1500-2000 IU)
Vitamin D 0.01 mg  (10 ug, 400 IU)
Vitamin C 35 mg  (35000 ug)
Vitamin E 4 mg  (4000 ug)
Vitamin B1 (thiamin) 0.3 mg  (300 ug)
Vitamin B2 (riboflavin) 0.5 mg  (500 ug)
Pantothenic acid 2500 ug
Biotin 40 ug
Niacin 6 mg (6000 ug)
Folic Acid 0.04 mg (40  ug)
Vitamin B12 0.0006  mg (0.6 ug)
Vitamin B6 0.4 mg (400 ug)
Vitamin K 12 ug
Infant recommended daily intake for minerals
Calcium 360 mg
Chloride 275-700 mg
Copper 0.5-0.7 mg
Magnesium 50 mg
Phosphorus 240 mg
Potassium 350-925 mg
Sodium 115-350 mg
Zinc 3 mg
Iron 10 mg
Iodine 40 ug
Manganese 0.5-0.7 mg
Fluoride 0.1-0.5 mg
Chromium 0.01-0.04 mg
Selenium 0.01-0.04 mg
Molybdenum 0.03-0.06 mg

These requirements generally increase after the first 6 months of life.

Infants consume about 750-800 g/day for the first 4-5 months (450-1200g/day range).

Note that most of the minerals in goat and cow milk are significantly higher than in human milk.  This, coupled with the higher protein of cow and goat milks (more than 3% compared to about 1.3%), make dilution necessary so as to avoid hypertonic dehydration (a result of high solutes in urine).  But, after dilution, carbohydrate should be added to cow or goat milk because human milk contains 7.0 g/100g lactose compared to about 4.5 g/100g lactose found in cow and goat milks.

Distinguishing between allergies and lactose intolerance:

Allergies and lactose intolerance are different things.

An allergic reaction is the body’s response to a foreign body (antigen), typically proteins. Goat milk proteins have slightly different amino acid structures than cow milk proteins. Thus, a person who produces antibodies to cow milk proteins, may not produce antibodies to goat milk proteins. However, there is no guarantee that a person who is allergic to cow milk will not be allergic to goat milk, because the milks are similar.

Lactose intolerance or lactose maldigestion result from a person’s inability to completely digest lactose. Because microorganisms in the gut will produce gas, symptoms of lactose intolerance include cramps, flatulence and bloating. Lactose is present in all milks. Thus, goat milk can not successfully be substituted for cow milk in cases of lactose intolerance.

A note about goat milk digestibility:

Goat milk’s tendency to be more easily digested than cow milk is due to its protein make-up. Goat milk has low levels of the protein alpha s1-casein, a protein that is involved in curd formation. Cow milk has higher quantities of alpha s1-casein than goat milk. In fact, some goats naturally produce very little alpha s1-casein. The higher proportion of small milk fat globules present in goat milk compared to cow milk may also contribute to goat milk’s tendency to be more easily digested.

Perhaps you’ve heard that goat milk is ‘naturally homogenized’:

Because fat is lighter than water, the cream portion of milk floats on top of the skim portion of milk. Most cows milks in the store are homogenized so that we do not see the two phases of milk. The milk is forced through tiny pores under high pressure to break the fat into smaller sized globules. Small globules distribute in milk and do not float as readily. One reason goat milk does not have to be homogenized is because it has a high proportion of small fat globules. The other reason is that goat milk lacks the protein agglutinin. Agglutinin makes fat globules stick together and float.

Article from :: http://www.saanendoah.com/compare.html

Got Goat Milk ???

What does goat’s milk give you that cow’s milk doesn’t? In many parts of the world, goat’s milk is preferred to cow’s milk. Even in the United States, the goat is gaining popularity. Goats eat less and occupy less grazing space than cows, and in some families the backyard goat supplies milk for family needs. Goat’s milk is believed to be more easily digestible and less allergenic than cow’s milk. Does it deserve this reputation? Let’s disassemble goat’s milk, nutrient-by-nutrient, to see how it compares with cow’s milk.

Different fat. Goat’s milk contains around ten grams of fat per eight ounces compared to 8 to 9 grams in whole cow’s milk, and it’s much easier to find lowfat and non-fat varieties of cow’s milk than it is to purchase lowfat goat’s milk. Unlike cow’s milk, goat’s milk does not contain agglutinin. As a result, the fat globules in goat’s milk do not cluster together, making them easier to digest. Like cow’s milk, goat’s milk is low in essential fatty acids, because goats also have EFA-destroying bacteria in their ruminant stomachs. Yet, goat milk is reported to contain more of the essential fatty acids linoleic and arachnodonic acids, in addition to a higher proportion of short-chain and medium-chain fatty acids. These are easier for intestinal enzymes to digest.

Different protein. Goat milk protein forms a softer curd (the term given to the protein clumps that are formed by the action of your stomach acid on the protein), which makes the protein more easily and rapidly digestible. Theoretically, this more rapid transit through the stomach could be an advantage to infants and children who regurgitate cow’s milk easily. Goat’s milk may also have advantages when it comes to allergies. Goat’s milk contains only trace amounts of an allergenic casein protein, alpha-S1, found in cow’s milk. Goat’s milk casein is more similar to human milk, yet cow’s milk and goat’s milk contain similar levels of the other allergenic protein, beta lactoglobulin. Scientific studies have not found a decreased incidence of allergy with goat’s milk, but here is another situation where mothers’ observations and scientific studies are at odds with one another. Some mothers are certain that their child tolerates goat’s milk better than cow’s milk, and mothers are more sensitive to children’s reactions than scientific studies.

Less lactose. Goat’s milk contains slightly lower levels of lactose (4.1 percent versus 4.7 percent in cow’s milk), which may be a small advantage in lactose-intolerant persons.

Different minerals. Although the mineral content of goat’s milk and cow’s milk is generally similar, goat’s milk contains 13 percent more calcium, 25 percent more vitamin B-6, 47 percent more vitamin A, 134 percent more potassium, and three times more niacin. It is also four times higher in copper. Goat’s milk also contains 27 percent more of the antioxidant selenium than cow’s milk. Cow’s milk contains five times as much vitamin B-12 as goat’s milk and ten times as much folic acid (12 mcg. in cow’s milk versus 1 mcg. for goat’s milk per eight ounces with an RDA of 75-100 mcg. for children). The fact that goat’s milk contains less than ten percent of the amount of folic acid contained in cow’s milk means that it must be supplemented with folic acid in order to be adequate as a formula or milk substitute for infants and toddlers, and popular brands of goat’s milk may advertise “supplemented with folic acid” on the carton.

GOAT’S MILK FORMULA VERSUS COMMERCIAL FORMULA FOR ALLERGIC INFANTS

Parents of babies allergic to cow’s milk and other commercial formulas often ask if it’s safe to use goat’s milk as an alternative. In theory, goat’s milk is less allergenic and more easily digestible than cow’s milk, but it should not be used as a substitute for infant formula. Like cow’s milk, it can cause intestinal irritation and anemia. If your baby under one year of age is allergic to cow’s milk-based formulas, try either a soy-based formula or a hypoallergenic formula. If your baby can’t tolerate either soy or hypoallergenic formulas, in consultation with your doctor and/or a pediatric nutritionist click here for goat’s milk formula recipe.

This formula has stood the test of time. One batch contains 715 calories and nineteen calories per ounce, which is essentially the same as cow’s milk formulas. This is sufficient for an infant six to twelve months. A baby on goat’s milk formula should also receive a multi-vitamin with iron supplement prescribed by her doctor. In infants over one year of age, goat’s milk can be readily used instead of cow’s milk. (Be sure to buy goat’s milk that is certified free of antiobiotics and bovine growth hormone (BGH). (For more information about goat’s milk call 1-800-891-GOAT)

article from :: http://askdrsears.com/html/3/t032400.asp

The Fact Of Goat Milk

Goat Milk is delicious, and the natural choice for those sensitive to cow milk and/or soy products.

Goat milk plays an important role in the diet of an ever-growing number of people who need and desire a cow or soy milk substitute with superior nutritional benefits and with the taste and richness of real, natural milk.

Worldwide, more people consume goat milk! It’s easier to digest than cow’s milk, higher in calcium, and it’s a wonderful kitchen companion for foods made with milk.

Love milk, but don’t like the tummy trouble? There is a delicious, refreshing glass of goat milk waiting just for you! Approximately one in ten persons who are allergic to cow milk can drink goat milk.

Goat milk is a calcium champ! Your body absorbs calcium more thoroughly when drinking calcium rich milk opposed to using supplement tablets. Goat milk is not only higher in calcium than cow milk, but is easier on sensitive stomachs.

Gourmet cooks love the taste! Its slightly sweet taste has often been described as “hazelnutty,” and its naturally creamy, smooth texture lends itself to a wide variety of delicious dishes … from morning cereal to casseroles, desserts, and ethnic dishes.

The Facts About Goat Milk

  • Goat milk contains only trace amounts of alpha S1 casein—the major protein of cow’s milk to which many people are allergic. Symptoms of cow milk allergy include eczema, diarrhea, gas, bloating, ear infections, and excess mucus.

Goat milk, like all natural milks (including human milk) contains lactose. So why are many so-called lactose intolerant persons able to drink goat milk? It has been hypothesized that because of goat milk’s superior digestibility, less undigested residue is left behind in the colon to ferment and cause the unpleasant symptoms of lactose intolerance. One significant difference from cow milk is found in the composition and structure of fat in goat milk. The average size of goat milk fat globules is about 2 micrometers as compared to 2-1/2 to 3-1/2 micrometers for cow milk fat. These smaller- sized fat globules provide a better dispersion and a more homogenous mixture of fat in the milk.

Article from :: http://meyenberg.com/core

Keistimewaan Susu Kambing

Susu Kambing adalah minuman yang tidak kalah bergizinya dibandingkan dengan susu sapi. Bahkan keluhan-keluhan kesehatan yang sering dijumpai akibat minum susu sapi tidak pernah ditemui beritanya pada orang-orang yang mengkonsumsi Susu Kambing.

Susu Kambing dapat menjadi alternatif bagi konsumen yang mempunyai alergi terhadap susu sapi.

Namun, manfaat Susu Kambing sayangnya masih belum disadari oleh kebanyakan orang. Hal ini dikarenakan jumlah serta pemasaran Susu Kambing yang memang masih sangat terbatas dan juga masih adanya salah persepsi akan Susu Kambing ini.

KEISTIMEWAAN SUSU KAMBING

Susu Kambing banyak manfaatnya. Selain sebagai makanan tambahan (food suplemen), susu kambing juga bisa mengurangi gangguan pernapasan (seperti asma, bronchitis serta TBC) dan Rheumatic serta penyakit-penyakit lainnya seperti : Asam Urat, Thalasemia, Flek Paru-paru, Disfungsi Seksual, Datang bulan tidak teratur dan masih banyak lainnya. Susu Kambing juga mampu mengontrol lemak tubuh dan menghaluskan kulit.

Keistimewaan susu kambing sebagai berikut :
1. Kaya Protein, enzim, mineral, vitamin A, dan Vitamin B (riboflavin). Beberapa jenis enzim juga terdapat dalam susu kambing, antara lain : Ribonuklease, Alkalin Fosfate, Lipase, dan Xantin Oksidase. Sementara beberapa mineral yang terkandung dalam susu kambing yaitu Kalsium, Kalium, Magnesium, Fosfor, Klorin dan Mangan.
2. Mengandung Antiantritis (inflamasi sendi).
3. Mempunyai khasiat untuk mengobati Demam Kuning, Penyakit Kulit, Gastritis (gangguan lambung), Asma, dan insomnia (sulit tidur).
4. Molekul lemaknya kecil sehingga mudah dicerna.
5. Bila disimpan di tempat dingin, tidak merubah kualitas khasiatnya.

Artikel dari :: http://susukambing.multiply.com/