Goat’s Milk: A Natural Alternative for Milk Sensitive Patients

The advertisement asks, “Got milk?” But what kind of milk? Twenty years ago, most people who routinely had milk with their morning cereal used whole milk. Today, with the concern for fat in the diet, many people have switched to low-fat milk or skim milk. And a significant number of people are opting for lactose reduced or lactose free milk.

There are other alternatives: take goat’s milk, for example. Patients with diarrhea, asthma, bloating and irritability may be suffering from the most common food allergy: cow’s milk. Goat milk is a natural alternative to cow milk and can comfortably be consumed by many patients who suffer from cow milk allergies or sensitivity.

Although goat milk, like cow’s milk and human milk, contains lactose, many people with lactose intolerance can drink goat milk. Why? It has been hypothesized that the reason lies in goat milk’s superior digestibility.

Goat milk is more completely and easily absorbed than cow’s milk, leaving less undigested residue behind in the colon to quite literally ferment and cause the uncomfortable symptoms of lactose intolerance.

It may also be that the patient is not lactose intolerant at all, but instead is one of the 1-in-10 people who are allergic to the major protein of cow’s milk … alpha S1 casein protein. The symptoms are almost identical to those of lactose intolerance. Both goat milk and human milk lack this offending protein.

The digestibility of goat milk can be attributed to its casein curd, which is both softer and smaller than that produced by cow*s milk. The smaller and softer the curd, the more easily accepted by the human digestive system.

Another significant difference between cow’s milk and goat milk is found in the composition and structure of fat. The average size of goat milk fat globules is about two micrometers, as compared to 2 1/2 to 3 1/2 micrometers for cow’s milk. These smaller sized fat globules provide a better dispersion and a more homogenous mixture of fat in the milk, another factor in making goat milk easier to digest.

Goat milk contains more of the essential fatty acids (linoleic and arachidonic acids) and a higher proportion of short-chain and medium-chain fatty acids than cow’s milk. The fat in goat milk may be more readily digested and absorbed than cow milk because lipases attack ester linkages of such fatty acids more readily than those of longer chains. And, unlike cow’s milk, goat milk does not contain agglutinin; as a result, the fat globules in goat milk do not cluster, which helps facilitate digestion and absorption.

Goat milk is a nutritious dairy option for many patients of different age groups and lifestyle needs. Young children and seniors can be especially sensitive to cow’s milk and so can certain ethnic groups, including Asians, Hispanics, African Americans and Native Americans.

Goat milk is an excellent option for any patient who is cow milk or soy milk sensitive and is necessarily concerned with obtaining adequate calcium from a natural dietary source. Goat milk is also an excellent source of dietary calcium important in the prevention of high blood pressure, osteoporosis and other bone-related problems. For menopausal women, goat milk provides 13% more calcium than cow’s milk and can be consumed comfortably even by those women with milk sensitivity.

While it is often recommended that children who have problems digesting cow’s milk change to vegetable protein soy-based formula, that is not always the answer. An estimated 20%-50% of children with cow milk protein intolerance will react adversely to soy proteins. Goat milk is a natural milk that children like and can consume comfortably, even if they are sensitive to cow’s milk and/or soy formula.

The nutrient composition of goat milk is very different than that of cow’s milk. In addition to containing 13% more calcium than cow’s milk, goat milk also has 25% more vitamin B-6, 47% more vitamin A, 134% more potassium and 350% more niacin. Goat milk is also higher in chloride, copper and manganese and contains 27% more of the essential nutrient selenium. Goat milk contains none of the controversial Bovine Growth Hormone (BGH).

References:

  1. Luke B, Keith LG. “Calcium requirements and the diets of women and children.” Journal of Reproductive Medicine.
  2. Haenlein GFW. “Role of goat milk in human nutrition.” International Conference on Goats, University of Delaware.
  3. Haenlein GFW, Ace D. Extension Goat Handbook. United States Department of Agriculture/USDA.

This article was taken from: http://www.chiroweb.com/archives/15/25/09.html

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Goats’ Milk Is More Beneficial To Health Than Cows’ Milk, Study Suggests

ScienceDaily (July 31, 2007) — Researchers have carried out a comparative study on the properties of goats’ milk compared to those of cows’ milk. They found reason to believe that goats’ milk could help prevent diseases such as anemia and bone demineralization. Goats’ milk was found to help with the digestive and metabolic utilization of minerals such as iron, calcium, phosphorus and magnesium.

Research carried out at the Department of Physiology of the University of Granada has revealed that goat milk has more beneficial properties to health than cow milk. Among these properties it helps to prevent ferropenic anaemia (iron deficiency) and bone demineralisation (softening of the bones).

This project, conducted by Doctor Javier Díaz Castro and directed by professors Margarita Sánchez Campos, Mª Inmaculada López Aliaga and Mª José Muñoz Alférez, focuses on the comparison between the nutritional properties of goat milk and cow milk, both with normal calcium content and calcium enriched, against the bioavailability of iron, calcium, phosphorus and magnesium. To carry out this study, the metabolic balance technique has been used both in rats with experimentally induced nutritional ferropenic anaemia and in a control group of rats.

In order to know how the nutritive utilisation of these minerals may affect their metabolic distribution and destination, the UGR researcher has determined the concentration of these minerals in the different organs involved in their homeostatic regulation and different haematological parameters in relation to the metabolism of the minerals.

Better results with goat milk

Results obtained in the study reveal that ferropenic anaemia and bone demineralisation caused by this pathology have a better recovery with goat milk. Due to the higher bioavailability of iron, calcium, phosphorus and magnesium, the restoration of altered haematological parameters and the better levels of parathyroid hormone (PTH), a hormone that regulates the calcium balance in the organism was found in the rats that consumed this food.

Javier Díaz Castro points out that the inclusion of goat milk with normal or double calcium content in the diet “favours digestive and metabolic utilisation of iron, calcium and phosphorus and their deposit in target organs – parts of the organism to which these minerals are preferably sent – involved in their homeostatic regulation.”

According to this researcher, all these conclusions reveal that regular consumption of goat milk – a natural food with highly beneficial nutritional characteristics – “has positive effects on mineral metabolism, recovery from ferropenic anaemia and bone mineralisation in rats. In addition, and unlike observations in cow milk, its calcium enrichment does not interfere in the bioavailability of the minerals studied.”

Although there is no doubt that these findings may be a base for further in depth study of the multiple health benefits of goat milk, the UGR researcher warns that “studies in humans are still required in order to confirm the findings obtained in rats and to promote goat milk consumption both in the general population and in the population affected by nutritional ferropenic anaemia and pathologies related to bone demineralisation.” Part of the results of this research has been published in the International Dairy Journal and Journal Dairy Science.

article from :: http://www.sciencedaily.com